@Lettuceeatlettuce@lemmy.ml avatar

Lettuceeatlettuce

@Lettuceeatlettuce@lemmy.ml

Always eat your greens!

This profile is from a federated server and may be incomplete. Browse more on the original instance.

Lettuceeatlettuce,
@Lettuceeatlettuce@lemmy.ml avatar

Same pattern as crypto. Hype the tech, spend millions on developing chips that can only do one specific thing, deploy them in a virtual gold rush, eventually the bubble pops and the last fools are left holding the bags trying to offload stacks of ASICs that are worthless.

Billions wasted trying to capitalize on “AI” that will largely cause more harm than good.

Debian's Dilemma (sh.itjust.works)

[Image description: A fox-woman wearing a dress the color of the Debian logo is being pulled by the sleeves on one side by a gnu man and on the other side bu a penguin. She has an annoyed expression. The gnu man says: “Debian, why do you offer a non-free firmware repo? You’re so close to being one of the few fully free...

Lettuceeatlettuce,
@Lettuceeatlettuce@lemmy.ml avatar

I look at it like this: the percentage of most people directly using FOSS vs proprietary software is 0%.

If I can get them to use even one piece of FOSS software, that increases the percentage, which is a win for FOSS.

I moved my parents onto Linux Mint a few months ago. They still use Spotify, Gmail, Chrome, Outlook, Onedrive, etc. But they are doing that through Linux, and I got them to switch their office suite from MS Office to OnlyOffice.

So instead of them being 100% on proprietary software, they are now using Linux, which protects them from malware and Microsofts spyware and bs, and makes them aware slightly of FOSS and how good it can be.

That is a net win as far as I can see. FOSS usage just increased slightly, and proprietary decreased, no other tradeoffs were made.

Lettuceeatlettuce,
@Lettuceeatlettuce@lemmy.ml avatar

It’s all or something, not all or nothing. You do the best you can. Use as much public transport or eco-friendly modes of transport. Walk, if you cant walk, bike/scoot, if you cant bike or scoot, bus/tram, if not that, motorcycle.

You get the idea, sounds like you’re already approaching this the right way, doing what you can. Be safe, driving motorcycles is dangerous, especially in the US.

Lettuceeatlettuce,
@Lettuceeatlettuce@lemmy.ml avatar

Been using OnlyOffice for years in multiple companies, haven’t had any problems. Word, Excel, PowerPoint presentations, no issues at all collaborating with other MS Office users.

And if you must have 100% MS apps, just use the browser-based apps. My current company is all Microsoft, I just do everything through the browser on my Debian 12 system. Teams, Email, SharePoint, Onedrive, etc. No issues whatsoever.

Lettuceeatlettuce,
@Lettuceeatlettuce@lemmy.ml avatar

There are no good dog breeders, or any pet breeders for that matter. In a world where thousands of abandoned pets are put down because there is no room anywhere for them, you have no good justification to purchase a pet from somebody who creates dozens more of them voluntarily to make money.

Lettuceeatlettuce,
@Lettuceeatlettuce@lemmy.ml avatar
  1. You were obviously talking about traditional pets, not service animals.
  2. The service animal industry is also largely problematic and exploitative.
  3. Rescue animals can serve as service animals in a large portion of cases anyways, you don’t need “purebreds” to work as herding animals, bomb detection animals, anxiety-comfort pets, guide pets for the blind, etc.

I know multiple people who have service/working animals and my spouse and I both work in the pet foster community, so no not uninformed.

Lettuceeatlettuce,
@Lettuceeatlettuce@lemmy.ml avatar

YouTube tech channels, especially tech news channels, Discord servers for Sys Admins and techies, topic specific Discord servers for things like Linux, Hardware, etc.

Lemmy communities for tech and tech news, multiple podcasts, and bookmark categories on my browser for tech news sites and forums like Level1Techs, Lawrence Systems, and Phoronix.

I also am subscribed to several tech email lists.

Most of the day while I’m at my desk, I have headphones on and I am listening to a rotation of those things. Every hour or two I casually browse random forums or discord servers on my phone for the latest news, drama, security breaches, announcements, etc.

I try to always have my ear to the industry, learning new stuff, staying in touch. Firstly because I actually really love tech, FOSS, hardware, etc. Secondly because it helps me do my job well, and more importantly, my tech hobbies well.

Lettuceeatlettuce,
@Lettuceeatlettuce@lemmy.ml avatar

Don’t use any Linux distro that has non-super users, that is a distro that restricts your ability to make changes on your system…

If you want a truly unrestricted OS experience, go daily drive TempleOS.

That actually would be nice, since you wouldn’t be able to connect to the internet anymore and we wouldn’t have to hear your pissing and moaning.

You seethe and rage against the ocean because it continues to make waves lol.

Lettuceeatlettuce,
@Lettuceeatlettuce@lemmy.ml avatar

Agreed. Classic story that has been repeated several times over the years. Ecosystem is everything.

Microsoft’s Windows phones were fantastic. They had super nice hardware, high refresh rate screens, better cameras on their flagship models than iPhones at the time.

They were sleek, fast, the Windows tile UI actually worked great on a phone touchscreen. But it didn’t matter to most consumers because they didn’t have apps. MS had their own business apps…and that was about it. Didn’t matter that every other aspect of the phones were great, people couldn’t do what they wanted to on the Windows phones, so they didn’t buy them.

I would love to see something like Proton but for .apks instead of Windows executables. If it were as easy to install and run android apps on a mobile Linux OS as it is now to install and play Windows games on Linux, we would be in a great place to see a proper Linux phone.

Lettuceeatlettuce,
@Lettuceeatlettuce@lemmy.ml avatar

On GrapheneOS right now typing this, love it! I switched over about 2 years ago to Graphene and never looked back. Rarely have any issues, solid battery life, all my apps work, life is good and private.

Lettuceeatlettuce,
@Lettuceeatlettuce@lemmy.ml avatar

What are you talking about? The tasks are things like, creating a folder in your Proton drive, creating a shareable link to a file, setting up a recovery method, etc.

Actually read the policies before spouting blind speculation.

And if your privacy needs actually require that level of paranoia, you shouldn’t be using a 3rd party email and cloud storage service anyways.

Lettuceeatlettuce,
@Lettuceeatlettuce@lemmy.ml avatar

I’ve been using their Unlimited plan for over a year. ~$8 a month for half a TB of cloud storage, automatic photo backup on mobile, fantastic web email and mobile email client, and a great VPN that allows for port forwarding and P2P-optimized servers.

Totally worth it for me. Great feature set, especially on their email. Everything runs smoothly on my systems. I run Linux on everything and their web client has always been really clean and responsive. Their mobile client too. I use GrapheneOS and haven’t noticed any issues with their email or VPN app so far.

Made switching from Outlook & Gmail super easy. I don’t miss those trash services at all, especially not Outlook lol.

Lettuceeatlettuce,
@Lettuceeatlettuce@lemmy.ml avatar

I studied hard for a few months, got my A+ and network+ certs from CompTIA.

Got my first helpdesk job making about 47K. 3 years later I was making 85K as a sysadmin. Stay in Helpdesk for 12-24 months, keep studying, start to learn a major infrastructure brand, Azure, AWS, Red Hat Linux, Xen Server, Cisco, etc.

Stay aggro on salary, don’t be afraid to jump from job to job as long as you’re there for at least a year and you leave on decent terms.

And for the love of Tux, don’t settle for piss pay. I can’t tell you how many IT folks I’ve met already in the industry who are Sys admins/engineers/network admins, making 20%,30%,40% under the average pay in their area. Money isn’t everything, but it sure as hell ain’t nothing either.

And never forget: The company doesn’t care about you.

Lettuceeatlettuce,
@Lettuceeatlettuce@lemmy.ml avatar

Totally right.

Lettuceeatlettuce,
@Lettuceeatlettuce@lemmy.ml avatar

Absolutely accurate.

Lettuceeatlettuce,
@Lettuceeatlettuce@lemmy.ml avatar

Not only networking unless you just wanna be a network admin. But networking is one of the most important components, you need the basics to be a good sys admin regardless.

Understand IP addressing, subnets, DHCP, DNS, OSI model, basics of packet anatomy, basics of routing and switching.

Have a solid understanding of those things plus a few other networking subjects, you’ll be able to troubleshoot really well. Don’t be the sys admin who barely understands IP addressing, I’ve known that person…not good.

Lettuceeatlettuce,
@Lettuceeatlettuce@lemmy.ml avatar

So this is definitely something that varies depending on your situation.

Depending on what country/state you live in, you may or may not have good employment laws protecting you.

On top of that, if you leave on solid terms, your former employer might put in an extra good word for you to your next one. I’ve even had one who offered to write a personal recommendation letter for my next employer.

It depends a lot on how much you are willing/able to play the game, and what the laws are in your region, and the nature of your employment type.

Lettuceeatlettuce,
@Lettuceeatlettuce@lemmy.ml avatar

For general system stats, I like btop. It runs in the terminal, so you can monitor it through SSH remotely. It also is much more readable than some of the other older top process monitors.

Docker desktop is a nice GUI interface for local docker container management, Portainer if you want something more enterprise grade.

Broadcom-owned VMware kills the free version of ESXi virtualization software (arstechnica.com)

Since Broadcom’s $61 billion acquisition of VMware closed in November 2023, Broadcom has been charging ahead with major changes to the company’s personnel and products. In December, Broadcom began laying off thousands of employees and stopped selling perpetually licensed versions of VMware products, pushing its customers...

Lettuceeatlettuce,
@Lettuceeatlettuce@lemmy.ml avatar

Check out XCP-ng. Open source, enterprise grade bare metal hypervisor.

I moved from ESXi to it about a year ago, it’s been solid. Lots of documentation and support from the community. Lawrence Systems has a ton of great videos on configuring it, both simple and advanced.

Lettuceeatlettuce,
@Lettuceeatlettuce@lemmy.ml avatar

Large portions of IBM, Rackspace, Alibaba, Oracle, and AWS’s cloud infrastructure are powered by the Xen Project hypervisor, which is the core of the XCP-ng stack.

Lettuceeatlettuce,
@Lettuceeatlettuce@lemmy.ml avatar

Proxmox is really good, same with XCP-ng. You could also run something like Debian server and roll your own KVM based platform if you have the chops.

Overall, lots of solid choices in the Open Source realm. I would avoid proprietary solutions, since that’s largely the reason the whole VMWare situation happened in the first place.

  • All
  • Subscribed
  • Moderated
  • Favorites
  • sketchdaily
  • ethstaker
  • modclub
  • mdbf
  • magazineikmin
  • Youngstown
  • rosin
  • InstantRegret
  • slotface
  • Durango
  • thenastyranch
  • kavyap
  • cisconetworking
  • DreamBathrooms
  • bokunoheroacademia
  • cubers
  • tester
  • everett
  • Leos
  • khanakhh
  • osvaldo12
  • lostlight
  • tacticalgear
  • normalnudes
  • relationshipadvice
  • GTA5RPClips
  • HellsKitchen
  • littleknowngames
  • All magazines