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ArtieShaw

@ArtieShaw@kbin.social
ArtieShaw,
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I was really expecting a "prison rat" punchline.

ArtieShaw,
ArtieShaw avatar

That's a sign of a good friend.

"Hold on, there's a stick on your back. Let me get it."

VS.

"There's a spider on your back."

ArtieShaw,
ArtieShaw avatar

It's time to pay the price.

ArtieShaw,
ArtieShaw avatar

I watched the Gormenghast miniseries on the Space Channel many many years ago and eventually read the books. They were interesting. Not something I'd want to revisit, but definitely weird.

ArtieShaw,
ArtieShaw avatar

In the US I'd count action by the national guard. We had one of those in 1970, but the kids didn't put up much of a resistance so it wasn't a prolonged battle.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kent_State_shootings

There may be others, but this springs to mind.

ArtieShaw,
ArtieShaw avatar

I fly a lot for work and I also do a fair bit of failure point and risk analysis as part of my job, so this is interesting to me in a couple of ways. Airports and airlines honestly do a decent job of checking that the people on the plane are the ones who are supposed to be there. A failure like this is reasonably unusual.

  • she got through physical security (baggage and carry-on checks)
  • to accomplish that, all she had to do was dodge the ID and boarding pass check.

That seems pretty feasible. If she was dressed vaguely like an employee it might have helped, but that's just speculation. We've all seen the gorilla walk through the ball game - after we were told to look for him - so it's not strictly necessary.

I have a harder time understanding how she could have boarded through the passenger line where they scan the passes.

I also have a slightly harder time understanding how she could have found a plane with open seats. I can view a seat map 12 hours ahead of boarding and see a plane with 10 open seats. When it comes time to board they're completely full. But - part of this is because the airline shuttles regional pilots to their main hub via any available seat and they do it at the last minute. And here's my further speculation: a flight from Nashville to LA is a long haul so this shuttling probably wouldn't come into play. If she checked seat availability in advance, it probably would have been accurate and she could probably help herself to a seat that appeared open.

The final hurdle seems to be the one that caught her. The article doesn't say exactly, but it says that authorities were waiting on the ground. Stewards have a flight manifest that lists every passenger by name and by seat. On rare occasions I've seen them checking the manifest as passengers board - for example, on overbooked flights where they've sold steward seats for take off and landing to passengers and they expect stewards to squat in the aisle. I've also heard anecdotally that if you're acting like a weirdo they'll look up who you are.

tldr: I could (and do!) give zero fucks about who won Sunday's sports match, but can conceive of why it might be news, of of interest, to some people.

ArtieShaw,
ArtieShaw avatar

Probably should have added a spoiler, but didn't think about it because of the good outcome.

I love how she puffs to show she means business and then just launches herself into the attack. Even though that eagle was huge, they were not going to get an easy meal!

Superb Owl material for sure.

ArtieShaw,
ArtieShaw avatar

Honestly, that part made me laugh harder. It's funny without it for sure. But the idea of these feckless birds who could have avoided all of that if they'd just taken the time to read the damn label makes it so much sillier.

ArtieShaw,
ArtieShaw avatar

What made the difference for me was buying a really nice reusable bag. There's a brand called Flip and Tumble. They'll hold an absurd amount of stuff (something like 35lbs, if I remember correctly) and fold down into something smaller than a tennis ball. I keep two in the bottom of my purse and never need a bag. They are expensive (about $18 US), but I've had mine for almost 15 years.

ArtieShaw,
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This happened during street festivities for lunar new year, so a lot of people are connecting the dots. They don't mention that the car was aggressively trying to drive through a crowd, but it seems like it was trying to make its way through a crowd.

https://www.kron4.com/news/bay-area/why-did-a-san-francisco-crowd-light-waymos-driverless-vehicle-on-fire/

Multiple witnesses said Waymo’s navigation technology became confused by festivities and fireworks that were lit to celebrate the Lunar New Year. Witness Anirudh Koul said the driverless car “got stuck immediately in front.”

Another witness said the car’s presence in the middle of Chinatown’s celebrations triggered frustrations in the crowd. “You could feel the frustration when people were just trying to celebrate,” she told KRON4.

ArtieShaw,
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My cat(s) would never forgive me.

OK - I'm lying. They wouldn't care but my husband would be super offended on their behalf.

ArtieShaw,
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That live feed is great.

I saw her earlier today, ripping up dead prey and feeding it to her two babies! They were covered in gore, but still adorable. And hungry! I had no idea baby owls could eat pieces as large as they did.

ArtieShaw,
ArtieShaw avatar

Thanks for digging into this a little further. It seems like small town news stories that get national attention don't always paint a full picture, particularly when there's an obvious moral high ground and an obvious victim or villain. I had several questions, because the story wasn't adding up.

What sort of monster would object to sheltering homeless in a cold snap? The entire city government, including the fire department?

There's an established shelter next door. Why did no one object to that? <thanks for answering this one, btw>

Since when did small towns in northwest Ohio start persecuting churches for no apparent reason? (for anyone out of the US, this population tends to be deep red GOP, very devout churchgoers, etc.)

This isn't the first time there has been a cold spell. It happens at least once a year in January or February. Do the homeless in this tiny town just freeze to death every year?

There's clearly a lot more to the story, but with national coverage like this I'd guess they were able to take in enough donations to cover basic repairs to the property.

ArtieShaw,
ArtieShaw avatar

I don't think that this cartoon was an intentional reference to crack. (Sadly - that's a great punchline.) The date on the cartoon is 1980, which would have been marginally too early for crack to exist. It certainly wouldn't have been an idea that was floating around mainstream culture.

I was curious enough to look it up.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crack_epidemic_in_the_United_States

It's just Larson being a master of weird, non-sequitur humor. And in this case, foretelling the future of underworld transactions in the 80s. Maybe not all psychics are quacks after all.

ArtieShaw,
ArtieShaw avatar

I love these little dolphins. They're from the era when the first coins were being invented and it seems like people hadn't settled on "round, please."

They're also cast bronze, which ended up being unusual for the Greek and later Roman world. The vast majority of ancient coins were hammered by hand using dies and heated metal disks. Coins in China, however, were made by casting for thousands of years. China also had some interesting ideas about money (ant money, spade money) before they settled on the traditional "round with square hole" design.

Star Trek TOS: watching for the 1st time

Holy hell, the miniskirts. I know it was progressive for its time, women’s lib, etc. But: Female officers bending over console, butt swell hanging out. Almost every episode, over sexualized women needlessly emotional, constantly falling into male arms. Barely clothed, wisps of fabric. Spock saying that Kirk’s alter ego...

ArtieShaw,
ArtieShaw avatar

That sounds weird. How were Soviets watching Star Trek?

ArtieShaw,
ArtieShaw avatar

I've been through it many times and expect to see many more. Both as the subject of an acquisition and as an acquiree. You just have to wait and see. If they're not immediately closing you down, there will be a transition period. Months to a year or more. That's where you need to be looking for a new job if that seems like a remotely feasible option.

With regard to your personal decision, do not trust what you're being told. The company wants a smooth transition and that means that the company wants to be the one making the decisions about who is working for them. They can and will lie.

The exception to this is if they ask you to stay on while they close out operations at your site. In that case they've already lowered the hammer, you're on borrowed time anyway, and it doesn't matter to them.

(Also - if you're given this option, consider it carefully before accepting. The folks I know who have done this have described it as a depressing and completely unpleasant experience. They all claimed they wouldn't do it again. If you choose to do so, ask for more money to compensate for the therapy you'll need afterwards. Be bold with your offer because it's a job that very few want to do.)


Generally speaking, the first thing that should happen is that the new company will harmonize efficiencies. This means cutting redundant departments, projects, or products. Expect to see a lot of strangers on site who are evaluating this. Non-specialized departments like finance, HR, legal, and support IT will be merged and streamlined. And do not expect that the highest performing department will survive. It's often the cheapest one who does. If the team in Kentucky can do a good enough job, it makes no sense for them to retain a higher paid workforce in DC. I've seen that sort of thing happen. (It's also sometimes a selling point for the company being bought. 🤮)

After that, it just depends on 1) why they bought you and 2) what they thought they were buying. If they find out that part of the acquired company isn't something they want but is valuable enough to re-sell rather than shut down, you may be in for a head-spinning transition between several buyers.

Overall -

The experience is a big shake-up, but I've gone through eight or so unscathed as a mid level employee. It all depends on lots of things outside of your control. It will help if you can accept that these things are beyond your control or beyond your ability to foresee. I can also assure you that there's a good probability that the people in charge won't be making good or sensible decisions.

Expect to see many of your co-workers jump ship, but that's not always a bad thing. Sometimes it's the kick in the ass that people need to make a change. That's often a very good thing.

ArtieShaw,
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Oh - these were the three friends found dead after being missing two days. And the homeowner didn't know that they were in his backyard.

It was strange for sure, particularly as there was no obvious cause of death when they were found. I mean, if three people show up dead together in a backyard, that's going to make the news.

ArtieShaw,
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The listing is as bonkers as you would expect.

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/354-County-Road-211-Bremen-AL-35033/215031920_zpid/?

They've also got a really elaborate dock/marina/enclosed fishing hole on the lake.

If I had the millions I'd buy it, torch all the furniture (except that one crazy ass bed), and redecorate.

ArtieShaw,
ArtieShaw avatar

Same, but I'd probably go with Bree. I'm a bit tall for the Shire. Also, Bree seems a little more lively and they have a thing called 'pints.'

ArtieShaw,
ArtieShaw avatar

I have casually considered attending a UU church near us. They seem very chill based on their website.

I would have to overcome my dislike of meeting new people and being awake and fully clothed before 11:00am on a Sunday. Those are the main challenges for me, personally.

I'm hoping to attend some public events at the a local nature preserve as a way of easing into social events with strangers. They have programs on bird watching, mushroom cultivation, etc... A year's membership cost $40 and it comes with free parking and free access to their programs. They're also part of a larger network of nature parks, so benefits include free admission to any of those.

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