Plants

FlashZordon, in Banyan trees, AKA strangler figs, can live for centuries. They germinate in tree branches and grow aerial roots downwards. This stabilizes them so they can wrap around the host tree, creating pressure until the host dies, leaving only the Banyan tree.
@FlashZordon@lemmy.world avatar

Front Street in Lahaina, HI has a great looking banyan tree near the harbor. Spent a bunch of time around there as a kid waiting for the ferry.

niktemadur, in Banyan trees, AKA strangler figs, can live for centuries. They germinate in tree branches and grow aerial roots downwards. This stabilizes them so they can wrap around the host tree, creating pressure until the host dies, leaving only the Banyan tree.

Do they kill the host tree, or is it a symbiotic relationship?

ClimbingBunny,
ClimbingBunny avatar

Yes they kill their hosts! By applying pressure they “strangle” the host until it dies and rots away, leaving an empty hole in the center of the tree.

meanmon13, in Mimosa Pudica, or Touch-Me-Not is a short creeping plant known for its ability to rapidly close its leaves in response to stimuli such as touch. It also "sleeps" at night, wherein the leaves close at night and open in the morning.

I had one of these for a few years, it grew happily in my window and one day it just up and died. Went from happy and bushy to dead within a few days. :-(

ClimbingBunny,
ClimbingBunny avatar

Aww, poor little guy.

sandpiper,

I believe they go dormant.

meanmon13,

I live in 10a and it was inside… I suspect my son poured something in it’s pot :-/

meanmon13, in Welcome!

Hi! I too like plants :-)

Fern,
@Fern@lemmy.world avatar

Oh really? Then I’m sure you can name a plant and what sound it makes.

HeartyBeast, in Borago Officinalis, or Starflower is a mid-sized herb with 5-pointed bright blue flowers. It is native to much of Europe. The leaves are edible and taste like cucumber, while the flowers are often dried or crystalized with sugar for edible decorations.
HeartyBeast avatar

Careful - don’t confuse it with comfrey which is common, looks quite similar but is hairier and tastes foul https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symphytum

Cobrachicken, in Borago Officinalis, or Starflower is a mid-sized herb with 5-pointed bright blue flowers. It is native to much of Europe. The leaves are edible and taste like cucumber, while the flowers are often dried or crystalized with sugar for edible decorations.

Flashback to the past, thank you! My dad used to put the flowers on mixed salads in the past. Very interesting taste, enhancing the salad experience quite a bit for young me.

ClimbingBunny,
ClimbingBunny avatar

That's amazing! I'd imagine they'd add a great pop of color to a salad.

Cobrachicken,

Color, taste and texture. Decided I'll try to source some for the garden - and future salads ;-)

Brimelle, in Borago Officinalis, or Starflower is a mid-sized herb with 5-pointed bright blue flowers. It is native to much of Europe. The leaves are edible and taste like cucumber, while the flowers are often dried or crystalized with sugar for edible decorations.

I've actually tasted some of these flowers on cupcakes before. I definitely could taste some kind of cucumber-like flavor, but it was slightly different.

ClimbingBunny,
ClimbingBunny avatar

Yeah the cucumber taste is why people tend to use a more neutrally flavored flower for edible decor. Although, there are some dessert flavors that I think go really well with it, like blueberry. The color is the major draw though. They really are beautiful.

1sthorn,
1sthorn avatar

I want to order some of these now. Its so nice to decorate with colorful flowers. Its so fun to say you ate a flower as well.

ClimbingBunny,
ClimbingBunny avatar

Right! You should totally go for it! They're a really colorful addition to a plate.

1sthorn,
1sthorn avatar

I should. I'll post it if I actually end up doing it.

MadWorks, in Borago Officinalis, or Starflower is a mid-sized herb with 5-pointed bright blue flowers. It is native to much of Europe. The leaves are edible and taste like cucumber, while the flowers are often dried or crystalized with sugar for edible decorations.
@MadWorks@lemmy.world avatar

Weirdly beautiful but bizarre looking. So interesting that is actually edible.

ClimbingBunny,
ClimbingBunny avatar

Yes! The older leaves grow hairs on them, so people tend to cook them in soups or stews to soften it up and make the texture less evident. Its a very interesting herb overall.

MadWorks,
@MadWorks@lemmy.world avatar

Do you know if this plant is commonly used in recipies/cooking in Europe?

ClimbingBunny,
ClimbingBunny avatar

I know its a common herb to add to soups and other dishes in Germany, but I don't know much about the cuisines of the surrounding countries.

MadWorks,
@MadWorks@lemmy.world avatar

I would love to try it someday. Hopefully I can visit Germany in the nearish future.

Nepenthe, in Pyrus Calleryana, AKA the Callery Pear, is a tree native to Southeast Asia. In the spring, it blooms with thousands of tiny white flowers and releases a foul odor. These fetid blooms turn into a hard, mildly poisonous fruit, which is consumable by birds.
Nepenthe avatar

This is one of the invasive ones, right? I've honestly never minded the smell, but I repeatedly hear other people saying it smells like various bodily fluids and I'm left confused.

ClimbingBunny,
ClimbingBunny avatar

Yes it is invasive in North America.

Tarasovich,
Tarasovich avatar

@ClimbingBunny @Nepenthe Ah, yes. The cultivar common here in Alabama is "Bradford Pear." Messy, malodorous, and super invasive in the American Southeast.

dumples, in What's wrong with my roses
dumples avatar

Our roses are struggling this year even though the last few years they have been thriving. We live in the Midwest zone 4 and this year is the first one not in a serious drought

ClimbingBunny, (edited )
ClimbingBunny avatar

Looks like potentially sun scorch or a fertilizer burn. How much have you been watering it/how much has it been raining, and when/what do you fertilize with?

dumples,
dumples avatar

We haven't fertilized this year at all so it can be that. I was thinking it was sun scorch. We typically water in the morning or evening but it's by the bird bath so it can get hit with water when we fill that.

We have been water every couple of days but we have had some big rain. It might be over watered since it's in a small space

ClimbingBunny,
ClimbingBunny avatar

Overwatering is definitely a possibility then, but discoloration would start on the leaf tips and be more consistent throughout, and typically more yellow, which makes me think it could be something more severe. It's hard to tell because of all the leaf breakage happening, though. Try cutting back on water for a few weeks, and if it doesn't get better you might be looking at an infection like Rose Mosaic. Hopefully not though!

dumples,
dumples avatar

Some others have suggested it's bugs. Either Rose Sawfliy or aphids.

ClimbingBunny,
ClimbingBunny avatar

Bugs would explain the breakage! Though this would have to be the most extreme case of rose sawfly I've ever seen, which is why I originally discounted it.

dumples,
dumples avatar

Apparently they are really bad this year where I live. At least that's what everyone else on the Internet thinks

Gamers_Mate, in Phytolacca Americana, or Pokeweed, is a herbaceous plant up to 2.5 meters tall, and native to North America. The plant is very toxic to mammals, especially the berries. Due to the risk from the toxins, and its density of growth, it is considered a pest.

As a mammal myself I now know not to eat these berries. ^^

Nepenthe,
Nepenthe avatar

More succinctly, they are magic berries that will make you not a mammal.

I used to see this all the time up in Virginia and never had any idea what to call it. My shock at seeing anything with a hot pink stem for the first time

ExtraPartsLeft,

The color is associated with the toxin if it’s not actually the toxin itself. You can eat (after boiling and draining the water repeatedly) the leaves of a young plant before the stems start turning colors. They used to eat them during the Great Depression because they grow so easy.

ClimbingBunny, in A leaf of a wild copper beech held against the sun. It gets trippier if you zoom in.
ClimbingBunny avatar

Wow, I love the way those colors pop. Thats incredible.

Brimelle, in Banyan trees, AKA strangler figs, can live for centuries. They germinate in tree branches and grow aerial roots downwards. This stabilizes them so they can wrap around the host tree, creating pressure until the host dies, leaving only the Banyan tree.

I see a lot of vines try to strangle plants, but I never knew there was a species of tree that would do the same thing... Nature is wild.

AuroraCelestine, in My enormous Rose of Sharon bush!
AuroraCelestine avatar

Lovely! Hope ours looks like that eventually

introvrt2themax, in Tulip breaking is a phenomena caused by a virus spread by aphids. It causes a flower's undertones to show in irregular streaks. In the 1600s this colorful effect was very desired. Nowadays the same result is achieved through planting Rembrandt Tulips
introvrt2themax avatar

I had no idea a virus could cause these streaks. I just thought it came about through selective tulip breeding (is that what it is called in horticulture?).

ClimbingBunny,
ClimbingBunny avatar

That is how the modern day Rembrandt Tulips came to be! They're a fairly modern plant courtesy of selective breeding. The virus was just the inspiration for the effect.

  • All
  • Subscribed
  • Moderated
  • Favorites
  • Plants
  • DreamBathrooms
  • mdbf
  • ethstaker
  • magazineikmin
  • GTA5RPClips
  • rosin
  • thenastyranch
  • Youngstown
  • InstantRegret
  • slotface
  • osvaldo12
  • kavyap
  • khanakhh
  • Durango
  • megavids
  • everett
  • cisconetworking
  • normalnudes
  • tester
  • ngwrru68w68
  • cubers
  • modclub
  • tacticalgear
  • provamag3
  • Leos
  • anitta
  • JUstTest
  • lostlight
  • All magazines