@dual_sport_dork@lemmy.world avatar

dual_sport_dork

@dual_sport_dork@lemmy.world

Apparently my current shtick is that I talk about knives at great length. Also motorcycles.

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dual_sport_dork,
@dual_sport_dork@lemmy.world avatar

Or the landlord might just want to spite the tenant, or he might want to sell to a “new” buyer who turns out to be business partner/cohort/shell LLC/etc.

dual_sport_dork,
@dual_sport_dork@lemmy.world avatar

You forgot the part about where the individual in question goes to jail when caught. That part is important.

A PR disaster: Microsoft has lost trust with its users, and Windows Recall is the straw that broke the camel's back (www.windowscentral.com)

It’s a nightmare scenario for Microsoft. The headlining feature of its new Copilot+ PC initiative, which is supposed to drive millions of PC sales over the next couple of years, is under significant fire for being what many say is a major breach of privacy and security on Windows. That feature in question is Windows Recall, a...

dual_sport_dork,
@dual_sport_dork@lemmy.world avatar

Isn’t Ubuntu Debian based? Or is that no longer the case? I haven’t used it for about a decade.

dual_sport_dork,
@dual_sport_dork@lemmy.world avatar

Your grandma would hate and complain about upgrading from Win10 to Win11 just the same, though. Everyone hates change itself. What the change is made to doesn’t really matter.

dual_sport_dork,
@dual_sport_dork@lemmy.world avatar

The thing is, during the 95/98/ME/XP/Vista days Microsoft had less competition in the consumer computing space, smart phones weren’t really a thing, and a PC was “the” way to get online. Nowadays everyone and their dog has an iPhone or Android device instead, and ever dwindling numbers of people even bother to have a PC anymore. So in modern times, there is a nonzero possibility that on a consumer level at least, Microsoft might finally slide into irrelevance. That’s not to say they’ll go out of business anytime soon, but they might not be able to remain the Microsoft we’ve known so far for too many more years.

Nerds use Linux. A lot of people who want to buy an off the shelf computer that “just works” buys a Mac. And everyone else just uses their phone for everything.

Microsoft doesn’t actually do anything (except make the XBox, I guess) that non-corporate users give a shit about except “make computer machine go” and “stupid subscription ribbon bar program I need to use to open files work sends me.”

This is why M$ has been so gung-ho about their path to enshittification in recent years, I’m sure. This is a profitability thing. They see the writing on the wall that just selling operating system and office suite licenses to rubes is not going to remain a profitable business model much longer. Instead, they have to scrape and datamine and sell adds and push subscriptions and all the rest of it for alternative recurring revenue, because no member of the public will willingly pay for a Windows license anymore. I sure as hell won’t… If I need Windows, I’ll pirate it. And there’s no way they are shifting as many OEM licenses as they were in the early 2000’s. People aren’t buying computers like that anymore.

dual_sport_dork, (edited )
@dual_sport_dork@lemmy.world avatar

Say it with me again now:

For fact-based applications, the amount of work required to develop and subsequently babysit the LLM to ensure it is always producing accurate output is exactly the same as doing the work yourself in the first place.

Always, always, always. This is a mathematical law. It doesn’t matter how much you whine or argue, or cite anecdotes about how you totally got ChatGPT or Copilot to generate you some working code that one time. The LLM does not actually have comprehension of its input or output. It doesn’t have comprehension, period. It cannot know when it is wrong. It can’t actually know anything.

Sure, very sophisticated LLM’s might get it right some of the time, or even a lot of the time in the cases of very specific topics with very good training data. But its accuracy cannot be guaranteed unless you fact-check 100% of its output.

Underpaid employees were asked to feed published articles from other news services into generative AI tools and spit out paraphrased versions. The team was soon using AI to churn out thousands of articles a day, most of which were never fact-checked by a person. Eventually, per the NYT, the website’s AI tools randomly started assigning employees’ names to AI-generated articles they never touched.

Yep, that right there. I could have called that before they even started. The shit really hits the fan when the computer is inevitably capable of spouting bullshit far faster than humans are able to review and debunk its output, and that’s only if anyone is actually watching and has their hand on the off switch. Of course, the end goal of these schemes is to be able to fire as much of the human staff as possible, so it ultimately winds up that there is nobody left to actually do the review. And whatever emaciated remains of management are left don’t actually understand how the machine works nor how its output is generated.

Yeah, I see no flaws in this plan… Carry the fuck on, idiots.

dual_sport_dork,
@dual_sport_dork@lemmy.world avatar

This is almost certainly what we’re looking at here. It’s the Ford Pinto for the modern age. “So what if a few people get blown up/defamed? Paying for that will cost less than what we made, so we’re still in the black.” Yeah, that’s grand.

Further, generative “AI’s” and language models like these are fine when used for noncritical purposes where the veracity of the output is not a requirement. Dall-E is an excellent example, where all it’s doing is making varying levels of abstract art and provided nobody is stupid enough to take what it spits out for an actual photograph documenting evidence of something, it doesn’t matter. Or, “Write me a poem about crows.” Who cares if it might file crows in the wrong taxonomy as long as the poem sounds nice.

Facts and LLM’s don’t mix, though.

dual_sport_dork,
@dual_sport_dork@lemmy.world avatar

To err is human. But to really fuck up, you need a computer.

dual_sport_dork, (edited )
@dual_sport_dork@lemmy.world avatar

…Nnnnno, actually always.

The current models that are in use now (and the subject of the article) are not actual AI’s. There is no thinking going on in there. They are statistical language models that are literally incapable of producing anything that was not originally part of their training input data, reassembled and strung together different ways. These LLM models can’t actually generate new content, they can’t think up anything novel, and of course they can’t actually think at all. They are completely at the mercy of whatever garbage is fed into them and are by definition not capable of actually “understanding” their output because they are not capable of understanding at all. The nature of these processes being a statistical model also means that the output is to some extent always dependent on an internal dice roll as well, and the possibility of rolling snake eyes is always there no matter how clever or well tuned the algorithm is.

This is not to say humans are infallible, either, but at least we are conceptually capable of understanding when and more importantly how we got something wrong when called on it. We are also capable of researching sources and weighing the validity of different sources and/or claims, which an LLM is not – not without human intervention, anyway, which loops back to my original point about doing the work yourself in the first place. An LLM cannot determine if a published sequence of words is bogus. It can of course string together a new combination of words in a syntactically valid manner that can be read and will make sense, but the truth of the constructed text cannot actually be determined programmatically. So in any application where accuracy is necessary, it is downright required to thoroughly review 100% of the machine output to verify that it is factual and correct. For anyone capable of doing that without smoke coming out of their own ears, it is then trivial to take the next step and just reproduce what the machine did for you. Yes, you may as well have just done it yourself. The only real advantage the machine has is that it can type faster than you and it never needs more coffee.

The only way to cast off these limitations would be to develop an entirely new real AI model that is genuinely capable of understanding the meaning of both its input and output, and legitimately capable of drawing new conclusions from its own output also taking into account additional external data when presented with it. And being able to show its work, so to speak, to demonstrate how it arrived at its conclusions to back up their factual validity. This requires throwing away the current LLM models completely – they are a technological dead end. They’re neat, and capable of fooling some of the people some of the time, but on a mathematical level they’re never capable of achieving internally provable, consistent truth.

dual_sport_dork,
@dual_sport_dork@lemmy.world avatar

I’m a developer and typing encompasses most of my day as well, but increasingly less of it is actually producing code. Ever more of it is in the form of emails, typically in the process of being forced to argue with idiots about what is and isn’t feasible/in the spec/physically possible, or explaining the same things repeatedly to the types of people who should not be entrusted with a mouse.

dual_sport_dork,
@dual_sport_dork@lemmy.world avatar

And untangling that clusterfuck can be damn near impossible.

The reaper may not present his bill immediately, but he will always present his bill eventually. This is a zero-sum thing: There is no net savings because the work required can be front loaded or back loaded, and you sitting there at the terminal in the present might not know. Yet.

There are three phases where time and effort are input, and wherein asses can be bitten either preemptively or after the fact:

  1. Loading the algorithm with all the data. Where did all that data come from? In the case of LLM’s, it came from an infinite number of monkeys typing on an infinite number of keyboards. That is, us. The system is front loaded with all of this time and effort – stolen, in most cases. Also the time and effort spent by those developing the system and loading it with said data.
  2. At execution time. This is the classic example, i.e. the algorithm spits out into your face something that is patently absurd. We all point and laugh, and a screen shot gets posted to Lemmy. “Look, Google says you should put glue on your pizza!” Etc.
  3. Lurking horrors. You find out about the problem later. Much later. After the piece went to print, or the code went into production. “Time and effort were saved,” producing the article or writing the code. Yes, they appeared to be – then. Now it’s now. Significant expenditure must be made cleaning up the mess. Nobody actually understood the code but now it has to be debugged. And somebody has to pay the lawyers.
dual_sport_dork,
@dual_sport_dork@lemmy.world avatar

Permit or not, he is still a Person Prohibited upon the instant of conviction. There is no delay or filing required. It is illegal for him to possess a firearm under both New York and federal law, presence of a soon-to-be-revoked New York carry permit or not.

dual_sport_dork,
@dual_sport_dork@lemmy.world avatar

Gee, yet another reason why mine is a Corel shop and we don’t use Adobe for anything.

dual_sport_dork,
@dual_sport_dork@lemmy.world avatar

You know, even as a lifelong technology nerd I have never actually meaningfully given a fuck about the thickness or lack thereof of any device’s bezels. What a worthless thing to get worked up about.

As a matter of fact, this can be (and has been) taken so far that it actually becomes a functional detriment. For instance, on the Moto G Power I just bought the touchable areas of the screen are so close to the physical edges and corners of the device that I frequently find the heel of my hand taps the shift key on the on screen keyboard unintentionally. It’s actually rather annoying.

I think the way the old Sharp Aquos Crystal did it is probably the best way if you absolutely must have maniacally tiny bezels to put as a bullet point on the spec sheet – That phone had basically no bezels top, left, and right but had a deliberate chin on the bottom to not only house the microphone and stereo speakers and front camera and all, but also give you a place to hold the damn thing.

dual_sport_dork,
@dual_sport_dork@lemmy.world avatar

It’s cool. We still haven’t brought back the headphone jack and we’re too cheap to include a memory card slot. “Courage.”

dual_sport_dork,
@dual_sport_dork@lemmy.world avatar

Important note: This is not Photoshopped.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=2SRLBQ8trhk

It is an actual thing that was built.

dual_sport_dork, (edited )
@dual_sport_dork@lemmy.world avatar

Cooperatives exist. This is how many condos work.

There should be a cap on the number of single family or duplex/triplex/quadplex/whateverplex free standing residences a commercial entity is allowed to own. Attempting to evade this cap with LLC’s and shell corporations and suchlike needs to result in jail time for those responsible. You want to be a small time landlord and rent out 1 or 2, or 5 or 6 properties? Fine. But nobody needs 100. If big capital wants to do big capital things, they can build tower blocks. Isn’t that what the walkable-cities-urban-utopists are always nattering on about anyway?

Homes are for homeowners to own. Not for private capital to speculate on.

Lemmy.ml tankie censorship problem

I feel like we need to talk about Lemmy’s massive tankie censorship problem. A lot of popular lemmy communities are hosted on lemmy.ml. It’s been well known for a while that the admins/mods of that instance have, let’s say, rather extremist and onesided political views. In short, they’re what’s colloquially referred to...

dual_sport_dork,
@dual_sport_dork@lemmy.world avatar

Was it actually him? I was under the impression that history did not relate what happened to him afterwards, nor who he was. That’s not to say the CCP did not murder a couple of thousand people during the crackdown regardless, because they did, but I have never seen a verifiable claim that a picture of any particular corpse actually was the Tank Man. There are numerous theories I’ve seen floated over the years alleging what may have happened to him afterwards ranging from him being caught and imprisoned, executed, living anonymously in China, or fleeing to Taiwan. All of them are unverified and, of course, mutually exclusive.

The tank operators absolutely did attempt to (and succeeded at) avoid running him over. That much is plainly visible in the video. Whatever happened after the video ended is undocumented and pure conjecture. Plenty of well documented atrocities actually were committed that day, before and after that moment, so there’s not much sense in inventing new ones and bickering over details we haven’t actually got.

dual_sport_dork,
@dual_sport_dork@lemmy.world avatar

Last time I tried this it immediately demanded I enter my domain credentials (which I don’t have, because I don’t run an Active Directory domain at home) and wouldn’t proceed without any. So I had to fall back on the disconnect-from-the-internet song and dance.

dual_sport_dork,
@dual_sport_dork@lemmy.world avatar

They have to go through all these gymnastics because otherwise, there is no compelling reason for any given user to create a Microsoft account just to use their damn computer. So they resort to trickery, nagging, and now tacitly trying to force the issue. Most users don’t know any better so they’ll just click “ok” on whatever pops up in their faces when they first power on their new PC and take the first thing that’s offered, which in this case is to sign up for a Microsoft account and tie your entire identity to it. Non-nerds don’t know the difference between that and a local account, and that’s dangerous.

It’s become normalized that in order to use any given device or software you’re expected to set up Yet Another Online Account, and that normalization is dangerous, too. I actively try to avoid such things but it’s becoming harder and harder as time goes on.

dual_sport_dork,
@dual_sport_dork@lemmy.world avatar

That’s precisely how the old ATI TV tuner cards worked. They masked part of your display and any pixels that were the mask color became the video player, because the decoding and injection into your video signal was happening in hardware on the tuner card, not on your regular graphics card.

This allowed you to do dumb stunts like scribble hot magenta areas anywhere on your screen with MS Paint and the scribbled areas would magically become video from the TV tuner.

dual_sport_dork,
@dual_sport_dork@lemmy.world avatar

no idea how that would be taxed

My utility company alleges that they charge a different – and higher, no surprise – rate for EV charging. I concur that I have absolutely no idea how they would know, unless you were dumb enough to volunteer to them that’s what you were doing and allowed them to install the charger themselves with its own attached meter. Especially if you’re using an L1 charger, plugging in your car would be indistinguishable from any other constant load like a heater.

dual_sport_dork,
@dual_sport_dork@lemmy.world avatar

And at current gasoline prices, it costs about $130 to fully fill up my truck. People are so set in their ways they don’t even flinch at this.

And this is why I do so as seldom as possible these days, and only use it to move large objects. The rest of my life happens on two wheels whenever it is physically possible. (My RXB250L achieves about 60 MPG. My Honda Metropolitan gets 117…)

dual_sport_dork,
@dual_sport_dork@lemmy.world avatar

Most of the complexity in a combustion vehicle is in the engine and transmission, both things that an EV hasn’t got. A lot of mechanical compromises are made to allow converting gasoline explosions into forward momentum.

An EV will still require brakes and tires, and eventually it’ll need replacement suspension components and probably wheel bearings just the same as any other car. And at some point it will surely need a coolant flush if the battery pack is liquid cooled, which it probably is.

But it will not require engine oil changes, air filter replacements, spark plugs, transmission flushes, a replacement clutch, or transmission rebuild; nor will it ever need a belt replacement, pulleys, tensioners, or idlers; nor a timing belt replacement, emissions system repairs, and thieves will never steal its catalytic converter.

An EV will, however, eventually require a battery pack replacement. Which is guaranteed not to be cheap.

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