@agamemnonymous@sh.itjust.works avatar

agamemnonymous

@agamemnonymous@sh.itjust.works

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agamemnonymous,
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The environment is toxic, pathogens are ubiquitous. Immune systems protect us from most pathogens, which only present a serious threat to the immunocompromised. The toxicity of the Internet and social media is indicative of compromised social immune systems.

agamemnonymous,
@agamemnonymous@sh.itjust.works avatar

Could you give exactly one example of that ever happening?

agamemnonymous,
@agamemnonymous@sh.itjust.works avatar

Llms are fucking stupid. They regularly ignore directions, restrictions, hallucinate fake information, and spread misinformation because of unreliable training data (like hoovering down everything on the internet en masse).

I mean, how is that meaningfully different from average human intelligence?

agamemnonymous,
@agamemnonymous@sh.itjust.works avatar

Those are distinct points from the one I made, which was about the characteristics listed. Sentience and sapience do not preclude a propensity to

regularly ignore directions, restrictions, hallucinate fake information, and spread misinformation because of unreliable training data

agamemnonymous,
@agamemnonymous@sh.itjust.works avatar

If she has the same lack of choice, she should absolutely choose the lesser evil for now and do what she can to rectify the situation after. She can bide her time with the “nice guy” while devising a plan of escape. If she gets stuck with the the abuser, she very well may not survive long enough to make the attempt.

You’re right, it doesn’t differ from what we should do: mitigate damage now to buy time to develop more meaningful solutions.

agamemnonymous,
@agamemnonymous@sh.itjust.works avatar

Good on you, it’s never too late to learn.

agamemnonymous,
@agamemnonymous@sh.itjust.works avatar

Third party candidates might aim to fix those issues, sure. Unfortunately, so long as our elections remain First Past the Post, third party candidates are not viable. In this system, third party voters aren’t fixing anything.

agamemnonymous,
@agamemnonymous@sh.itjust.works avatar

This intersection is the start of my daily commute. Drive to the median, clear of traffic in both directions, then check incoming traffic before proceeding

agamemnonymous,
@agamemnonymous@sh.itjust.works avatar

After all the OGL drama I considered going to PF2 also, but after a little research decided if I was going to take the time to learn a new system and embrace crunch, I might as well go all the way and landed on GURPS. Got rid of all my 5e stuff and haven’t looked back

agamemnonymous,
@agamemnonymous@sh.itjust.works avatar

Any story set after an apocalypse is post-apocalyptic. Back to normal is pretty optimistic even for 28 years. Maybe the whole premise is shifted from “zombies” to “long-term consequences of a relatively short period of zombies”? It’s an interesting angle that doesn’t get a lot of attention. What does happen when the zombies finally die off? How does that affect society decades down the road?

agamemnonymous,
@agamemnonymous@sh.itjust.works avatar

Reflecting on your mistakes lets you learn from them and not repeat them. Reducing the number of mistakes you make is good for survival. Sorry, this is a feature not a bug.

What's your go-to "Bang for your Buck" filament brand?

As I’m graduating college in a few weeks, I’ll be losing access to my university’s free printers and filament. I’m going to build up a home lab with a couple printers where I can make goofy little mechanical projects as well as some components for my cars and stuff....

agamemnonymous,
@agamemnonymous@sh.itjust.works avatar

I do everything in black anyway, and 4 packs of Elegoo PLA are like $45. No complaints so far and $11-12/kg is hard to beat

agamemnonymous,
@agamemnonymous@sh.itjust.works avatar

Kandinsky was the first artist to come to mind

agamemnonymous,
@agamemnonymous@sh.itjust.works avatar

Did they sleep through their assassination window?

agamemnonymous,
@agamemnonymous@sh.itjust.works avatar

I know this is a point of some contention among the deaf community, but how do you feel about the development of a “standard” international sign? Personally, and I’m speaking as a fully hearing person, I think a basic international sign should be developed and taught to everyone. Not only to facilitate communication with the hard of hearing, but also in loud environments and with those who don’t share a spoken language.

It’s my understanding that a large portion of the deaf community is hostile to the idea of a universal sign from a cultural perspective, since each regional sign has cultural content. However I think it’s a potential solution for numerous issues, with more pros than cons.

agamemnonymous,
@agamemnonymous@sh.itjust.works avatar

It would certainly be limited and rudimentary; I wouldn’t suggest a solution exists capable of any broad nuance. But gesture is a unique variety of communication, in that it can convey “innate” meaning in ways verbal language simply cannot, except in the case of onomatopoeia. Pointing is nearly universal, smiling is nearly universal, beckoning is nearly universal. Gesture is a spatial form of communication, centered around our primary means of material interaction with the world.

Grammar and syntax aside, I’d argue that it would be possible to assemble a vocabulary of universal concepts (eat, drink, sleep, travel, me, you, communicate, cooperate, come here, go away, etc). Certainly not a language for extended detailed conversation, but a codification and extension of gestures which are already nearly universal by virtue of their innate implications alone. Enough to communicate that you’re hungry, but not enough to send for takeout.

A universal language, at the level of any other sophisticated language, is obviously impossible. A formal codification of simple gestures to communicate at the most basic human concepts is much more doable.

agamemnonymous,
@agamemnonymous@sh.itjust.works avatar

I am familiar with the regionality of language. I don’t understand your point, you’re simultaneously saying that you can’t have universal understanding, but we have gestures we instantly understand instantly so there’s no need to codify them, but they look different.

I think you’re wildly overestimating the scope of my proposal.

agamemnonymous,
@agamemnonymous@sh.itjust.works avatar

My goalposts are in precisely the place they started: a collection of basic international gestures to facilitate the most basic communication. Where are you jumping to colonization? Where did I say that my cultural group gets to decide what the signs are? You’re, again, wildly overestimating the scope of my proposal and jumping to ridiculous, unsubstantiated conclusions.

You get a group of signers from around the world to develop an international pidgin (like they already do informally at international gatherings) and come to consensus based on commonality. When the majority agree on a sign, use it. Where there’s little agreement, choose a new sign. No finger spelling, no complex abstract concepts, just a formalization of gestures most people could probably figure out anyway. I fail to see how that perpetuates colonization unless that’s what you’re setting out to do with your methodology.

agamemnonymous,
@agamemnonymous@sh.itjust.works avatar

“It would be nice to develop an auxiliary sign language to bridge the accessibility gap between the hard of hearing and those who don’t learn a dedicated sign”

“You’re just as bad as the colonizers that decimated native American cultures”

Get out of here with that bad faith savior complex nonsense. Teaching indigenous people English wasn’t the problem, the problem was beating children for using their native language. I guess you think literacy is racist too because literacy requirements were used to disenfranchise black Americans, huh?

Your sanctimonious colonization comments are dripping with irony. I asked a question, directly to another person, about their opinion of the concept as a deaf/hard of hearing person. You interceded uninvited, deliberately ignored the explicitly stated context of the question (gestural languages having unique properties from verbal ones) so you could shoehorn in your opinion about a topic explicitly excluded by that context, which you smugly assumed I wasn’t familiar with, purporting the relevance by referencing authors who wrote very little about the actual topic at hand.

You want to talk about colonizers, look at your own actions here.

agamemnonymous,
@agamemnonymous@sh.itjust.works avatar

Deontology is moral masturbation, a luxury reserved for those with little effect on the world. Responsible, conscious adults have to take into account the consequences of their choices. Politicians’ choices have consequences which are orders of magnitude more significant than a random person. The president of the United States, especially this president ahead of this election, has a vast number of complex consequences to consider in their moral calculus.

When political choices have moral consequences, and vice versa, you can’t draw a tidy line between the two considerations.

agamemnonymous,
@agamemnonymous@sh.itjust.works avatar

Did I? I described a practice as moral masturbation, I didn’t accuse anyone of anything.

agamemnonymous,
@agamemnonymous@sh.itjust.works avatar

This is an impressive contribution.

agamemnonymous, (edited )
@agamemnonymous@sh.itjust.works avatar

as long as you accept the data

Ehhhh, data isn’t necessarily sacrosanct. Bad methodology, bad equipment, or bad presentation can lead to biased or misleading data. Hell, every once in a while purely fabricated data slips through the cracks.

It’s still the best guide we have, and mountains of data from disparate sources should be very suggestive indeed, but science involves being able to question even well-accepted hypotheses, on the slim-but-non-zero chance that all that data was based on some common methodological flaw. If the hypothesis is correct, it’ll stand up to scrutiny.

Yeah, you’ll get some whackadoos with their thumbs in their navels, but those whackadoos are an important part of the scientific ecosystem; random mutations in scientific evolution which every once in a long while turn out to be useful, if only in getting serious scientists to look at a problem from a new angle. Stagnation’s a bitch.

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