@llewelly@sauropods.win
@llewelly@sauropods.win avatar

llewelly

@llewelly@sauropods.win

I tried to write an introduction and it was so empty it collapsed inward on itself

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futurebird, to random
@futurebird@sauropods.win avatar

I'm getting a lot of flack for calling ants without agriculture "hunter gatherer ants" but I think its totally valid and will NOT be stopping.

llewelly,
@llewelly@sauropods.win avatar

@futurebird
but "forager" is shorter and doesn't give undue primacy to hunting.

llewelly,
@llewelly@sauropods.win avatar

@futurebird
oh, well, I can agree with that.

It does bring to mind a question: Are there any ants who practice irrigation? (Not including humidity control of the nest, which as far as I know they all do.)

gay_ornithischians, (edited ) to random
@gay_ornithischians@sauropods.win avatar

friends the brain is...

llewelly,
@llewelly@sauropods.win avatar

@gay_ornithischians
animal brains do not seem especially similar to the digital electrical computers that humans build and design. However - certain mathematical rules associated with computer science, such as the halting problem, are actually far more general in what systems they apply to; they don't just apply to modern digital electrical computers, and they most likely apply to animal brains.

mrundkvist, (edited ) to Geology
@mrundkvist@archaeo.social avatar

Rauks are ancient fossilised coral reefs that survived when the surrounding soft laminated limestone eroded away after the Ice Age.

llewelly,
@llewelly@sauropods.win avatar

@mrundkvist
now I'm trying to figure out where I learned the factoid that the Silurian had been previously called the Gotlandian by a few geologists (not majority), before Murchison got his way.

futurebird, (edited ) to random
@futurebird@sauropods.win avatar

Without looking it up what is closest to 8oz?

(Curious how well the relation between oz and metric is generally known.)

llewelly,
@llewelly@sauropods.win avatar

@futurebird
unhelpfully, the us customary fluid ounce and the british imperial fluid ounce are not quite the same; the imperial is about 1 ml smaller .

edit: I forgot to add that in this case, it doesn't affect answers to the poll.

futurebird, to random
@futurebird@sauropods.win avatar

Rent five black SUVs.
Casting call for some wide men in suits. Give a few ear pieces.

Show up at random places, do mundane things. Do not explain. See how long it takes to get in the press.

Better than a casting call you'd really need to have the big guys in your art collective to play the roles ... no one can talk to the press or explain.

Carry a formicarium. The one thing they can say "It's not about her, I can't tell you who she is, of course, but it's not about her, it's that ant."

llewelly,
@llewelly@sauropods.win avatar

@futurebird
don't make my ant o' rage angry

you wouldn't like my ant o' rage when it's angry

futurebird, to random
@futurebird@sauropods.win avatar

I feel like I need to say that Trump had a rally in the Bronx after all. He even found some black people to stand with him. It seems like he's making friends at the courthouse ... people he can commiserate with about how mean those prosecutors are. The guys he was with are notorious criminals. Gang leaders responsible for shootings.

They are not well liked at all.

But I can see how Trump would find them ... relatable. They are his peers in so many ways.

https://www.sfgate.com/news/politics/article/trump-appeared-on-stage-at-his-bronx-rally-with-19477236.php

llewelly,
@llewelly@sauropods.win avatar

@futurebird back when he was mayor of NYC, I was very sure he took on organized crime figures because he wanted a monopoly on organized crime. As someone who has been east of the Mississippi only a few times, and whose mental image of NYC was based on having started reading the NYT at age 5 (way too early), and having watched a dozen episodes of Sesame Street, I could have been very wrong, but looking back on it, I don't think I was too far off.

futurebird, to random
@futurebird@sauropods.win avatar

There were once giant aquatic sloths, like seacows... but sloths. (Thalassocnus)

And they lived in fear of the toothy teethed whale dolphins (Acrophyseter) who are the scariest things I've ever seen.

Miocene is one giant uncanny valley. I don't know why it doesn't get more attention for the sheer creep out factor.

llewelly,
@llewelly@sauropods.win avatar

@futurebird
yeah - Thalassocnus also occurs in the same deposits (Pisco Formation in Peru) as Livytan, another macroraptorial sperm whale, related to Acrophyseter, but about 3 times as long.

link to a picture of a reconstruction of the skull of Livytan:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Livyatan#/media/File:Livyatan_melvillei_skull.jpg

You have to wonder how Thalassocnus survived. But that branch of sloths was around for at least a few million years.

llewelly, to random
@llewelly@sauropods.win avatar

today I learned knife fish have 3 sets of jaws: mandibular jaws, pharyngeal jaws (like those of moray eels), and the "tongue-bite apparatus". This is shocking, because knife fish is the group that includes the infamous electric eel (which is technically not an eel) .

ai6yr, to random
@ai6yr@m.ai6yr.org avatar

Safety note: do not accidentally stab yourself with a steak knife reaching for something else in the dish rack, LOL. It's painful, even if you don't break the skin. If it looks like I was in a knife fight, it was just with myself 😂

llewelly,
@llewelly@sauropods.win avatar

@ai6yr the dishwasher: invented to make dishwashing easier, for the low, low price of being stabbed by hot forks when you're impatient.

ai6yr, to Birds
@ai6yr@m.ai6yr.org avatar

Crow intelligence in action: the crows here will eat animals that have been visibly wounded/hit by cars/etc., but will NOT eat animals which do not have visible marks (ie potentially rat poisoned).

llewelly,
@llewelly@sauropods.win avatar

@ai6yr
rat poison is a huge problem for nearly every carnivore (and most omnivores) of rat-size or larger, and it's a relief at least some of them are learning how to avoid it.

bruces, to random
@bruces@mastodon.social avatar

*What would "animal humor" even look like -- practical jokes, deception, physical slapstick, mime, camouflage, maybe some comic songs

llewelly,
@llewelly@sauropods.win avatar

@bruces
there are some animals - octopuses, parrots, dolphins, elephants, non-human primates - for which all of the above seem plausible, though I can't easily summon scientific evidence one way or the other.

futurebird, (edited ) to random
@futurebird@sauropods.win avatar

I don't know, pick one:

A. You have an excellent education, the means to answer questions: building a consistent understanding of the world. You are hard to trick. That said, you live in a society where the powerful can't be criticized. Many things you know cannot be said.

B. You freely and loudly express your ideas. But, you have very little education, formal or otherwise. You have been tricked before & know you could be again. You just don't have the best tools to prevent this.

llewelly,
@llewelly@sauropods.win avatar

@futurebird
having spent some time in various skeptic communities, it has been my experience that on average, people who are sure they can't be tricked are usually much worse people than people who know they will be tricked and accept it as inevitable.

And both groups seem to get tricked with aproximately similar frequencies.

llewelly,
@llewelly@sauropods.win avatar

@futurebird
But one of the most important ways to learn how to distinguish good sources from bad comes from understanding when you've been tricked in the past, and how that happened. And that requires admitting that you can be fooled. As with so many other things, mistakes are part of the learning process.

futurebird, to random
@futurebird@sauropods.win avatar

Are you living in your home or apartment, living your own life...

OR

...do you run a bed and breakfast for your cat?

llewelly,
@llewelly@sauropods.win avatar

@futurebird in all honesty, dry cat food is cheap compared to typical bed-and-breakfast food.

futurebird, to random
@futurebird@sauropods.win avatar

At the Role-Playing Games club today, a fun debate. The whole campaign is on this ice-locked ship in the arctic: the DM introduced the possibility of sirens.

One player declares their character is ace and therefore immune to romantic seduction.

Not so, says DM these sirens call out with "whatever you desire most" ... another player wonders if, since their character is monk seeking enlightenment and the death of all worldly desires are they immune?

Apparently the sirens do enlightenment too.

llewelly,
@llewelly@sauropods.win avatar

@futurebird
there were some book-and-paper role playing games in which all dice rolls were replaced with the player making a plausible narrative argument for the turn of events to go their way. Amber (based in the universe of the Roger Zelazny Amber novels) was probably the most widely known. I couldn't convince my players to give it a try, which I found surprising, since all of them seemed to make multiple attempts per session to sway my rulings with plausible narrative arguments.

llewelly, to random
@llewelly@sauropods.win avatar

google 15 years ago: "We're using machine learning to fight the spam industry"

google today: "We're using machine learning to be the spam industry"

futurebird, to random
@futurebird@sauropods.win avatar

I know N. flavipes is invasive but they are still very pretty ants. This is what we get for importing so many plants. The garden trade is almost wholly responsible for nearly all of the invasive ants! Stop planting non native plants!

llewelly,
@llewelly@sauropods.win avatar

@futurebird
flat worms, jumping worms, little frogs, little blindsnakes, spiders, endless insects - the plant trade transports them all!

(astonishingly, spotted lanternfly arrived by a rock importer ... )

futurebird, to random
@futurebird@sauropods.win avatar

There is an ant colony that lives in the cracks of the asphalt in 2nd ave. In the center of the street. I don’t know if I should call them absolute legends or idiots. They use the cracks as highways like sidewalks ants. It’s a big colony although I can never get a good look at them without getting hocked at.

Perhaps I am the legendary idiot in this story.

llewelly,
@llewelly@sauropods.win avatar

@futurebird
♬ ant house ♬
♬ in the middle of the street ♬

timhutton, to random
@timhutton@mathstodon.xyz avatar

Do all animal's mouths open horizontally?

llewelly,
@llewelly@sauropods.win avatar

@timhutton @simon @futurebird
I think fusion of both sides of the mandibles is the norm in tetrapods generally, but there are a number of notable exceptions, particularly baleen whales, and snakes, which for somewhat different reasons have a highly stretchy muscle there, which allows the two sides to spread very far apart, and yet be able to pull them back together when needed. Then there's Ornithischians and their predentary bone, but I've run out of room.

futurebird, (edited ) to random
@futurebird@sauropods.win avatar

Best movement of “The Planets” by Holst?

llewelly,
@llewelly@sauropods.win avatar

@futurebird
I voted Uranus, but thanks to star wars, mars always wins, 'cause that's the one everyone knows and associates with their favorite films.

llewelly,
@llewelly@sauropods.win avatar

@futurebird @noplasticshower
I mean, there are differences, but you need to have some familiarity with both pieces to recognize them. That's not to say the differences are insignificant; Williams' changes better suit the theme of the empire.

gay_ornithischians, (edited ) to random
@gay_ornithischians@sauropods.win avatar

my thoughts on Reiner, A. 2023

(painting by Dylan Bajda, it has been cropped and vandalized for this post)

llewelly,
@llewelly@sauropods.win avatar

@gay_ornithischians sorry. I read as much of as I could stomach, but I guess that amounts to maybe half of the words. And I've already forgotten much of it. And since I'm not a neuroscientist, I am afraid I'll never really understand it. I admit this makes me a bad critic of the paper in question.

llewelly,
@llewelly@sauropods.win avatar

@gay_ornithischians
I'm now trying to think of some set of conditions that might push a ceratopsian to evolve a huge brain instead of (or in addition to) a huge set of frill and horns.

the endpoint that comes into my head is ceratopsians who dig ditches to irrigate crops, and the need to irrigrate crops is what requires the big brains, BUT how do they get there? I have no idea.

llewelly,
@llewelly@sauropods.win avatar

@gay_ornithischians hm, I really like this idea, thank you.

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