cstross, to random
@cstross@wandering.shop avatar

June 10. Do you revise and add more plot if you feel your story is too short?

I try not to unless my agent or editor tells me to. I tend to write long, so it's a constant struggle against fictive weight gain. (Caveat: my next novel was originally going to be a novelette, then a novella … then my editor decreed "more back-story, make it a novel", so there goes any hope of it making the Hugo shortlist in 2026.)

anderlandbooks, to random German

June 10. Do you revise and add more plot if you feel your story is too short?

I did that in my early days, but not any more. If the story's done, it's done.

sfwrtr, (edited ) to 13thFloor
@sfwrtr@eldritch.cafe avatar

Ch 10 Nbr 10 — Do you revise and add more plot if you feel your story is too short?

Inklings was supposed to be a sudden fiction story, but 800 words proved insufficient to express a shy person's predicament with attraction. Adding more words developed the characters to where I could see a further ending, first to where they might misinterpret themselves into bed, and then again to where the love interest's past breaks into the present and the MC has to save his life with her magic. Now I see an epilogue, too.

Yes. Each change required a revision and backfilling earlier parts to create foreshadowing. This allowed me to add more plot.

Was it because it was too short?

Um... except for the 800 words in the beginning, well... dunno.

[Author retains copyright (c)2024 R.S.]

and



golgaloth, to writing
@golgaloth@writing.exchange avatar


How do you select ideas from all the ones floating around?

My stories usually come when some person, or an image of them, an action they're doing, a location they're in, etc, gets stuck in my head. Usually there's a strong emotional feel attached. My new book, for instance, started when I was dozing away one morning and in my head a woman woke up next to a dead body and said, "Oh, no. Not again." That made me sit up.

Firlefanz, to fantasy
@Firlefanz@writing.exchange avatar

6/9: How do you select ideas from all the ones floating around?

I used to go for the shiny one.

Still do that (I often take time out to write a new shiny), but now I also look at what is selling.

It's easy to add a book to my Wolves. And I have so many shifter ideas...

I'll also finish the Winds and Pillars, of course.

Then there's Penumbra, the Twin Worlds (YA Portal Shifters), then another spicy shifter series, an epic fantasy series...


anderlandbooks, to random German

June 9: How do you select ideas from all the ones floating around?

Uhm. I guess I take the one that sticks to my brain and develops a life of its own.

The rest get noted down for "some time later" (I have already used some of these ideas for later, too 😁. They're not abandoned. They're dormant.)

sfwrtr, to 13thFloor
@sfwrtr@eldritch.cafe avatar

#WritersCoffeeClub Ch 10 Nbr 09 — How do you select ideas from all the ones floating around?

I require a character I can relate, to with an agenda to fulfill and a problem to solve. If that generates an ending I can write toward, it's "Tag yo it!"

Sadly, I sometimes write without an ending. Those rarely end well.

[Author retains copyright (c)2024 R.S.]

#BoostingIsSharing and #CommentingIsCool

#fiction #fantasy #sf #sff #romance #sciencefiction #writing #writer #writers #author #writingcommunity #writersOfMastodon
#RSdiscussion

WanderingInDigitalWorlds, (edited ) to random
@WanderingInDigitalWorlds@mstdn.games avatar

June 8
Do you agree with Michael Moorcock, who said: "Ignore all proffered rules and create your own, suitable for what you want to say"?

I feel he has said something profound, after reading his works; he ignored the things which would've made his stories stale but embraced that which makes them great reads!

There is a balance between accepting the rules which make sense and ignoring those which are constraining the creative vision that lives within. He was a maverick.

Firlefanz, to random
@Firlefanz@writing.exchange avatar

5.7 — What do you do first when you start a new writing project?

I... err... write.

That's usually what I do. The world tends to grow as I write, the characters begin to show themselves, and eventually, the full plot is revealed.

I don't plan.

I know a few things (for the Wolves, I started with the three McMullen siblings), but with Connor? I just knew he took over bodyguard jobs, as told in Book 3.

A Wolf's Fury, Wolves of the South 4


anderlandbooks, to random German

Jun 8 Do you agree with Michael Moorcock, who said: "Ignore all proffered rules and create your own, suitable for what you want to say"?

Since I'm not sure I even know all these rules, I guess I agree 😅

The only rule I follow is - if I want to publish it, it must be readable. And here are some guidelines that will help you make it easier for the reader to follow your thoughts.

Works for me. 🤷‍♀️

chameleon_muse, to random
@chameleon_muse@toad.social avatar

- June 1 -Intro and update.

Day - I work at a psychology clinic as a behavior technician providing direct intervention services to children with communication disorders.

Night - I write and paint creative fiction. Ongoing projects are mostly on hold due to time constraints.

chameleon_muse,
@chameleon_muse@toad.social avatar

- June 2. Do you have any regrets as a writer, or do you never look back?

Writing is a free flowing process for me and unending. No.

sfwrtr, to 13thFloor
@sfwrtr@eldritch.cafe avatar

Ch 10 Nbr 08 — Do you agree with Michael Moorcock, who said: "Ignore all proffered rules and create your own, suitable for what you want to say"?

Context is important here, so here's the full quote for you to read first: https://www.writingclasses.com/toolbox/tips-masters/michael-moorcock-10-tips-for-good-storytelling#:~:text=Carrot%20and%20stick—have%20protagonists,what%20you%20want%20to%20say.

The advice boils to down to learn how to write and practice enough that you understand the basics (items 1 through 9), and understand what about all that gets in the way of you telling your tale... then tell your tale the way you need to tell it instead. I kinda agree...

To the extent you can be truthful with yourself and keep your ego at bay. This took me decades.

YMMV.

[Author retains copyright (c)2024 R.S.]

and


sfwrtr, to 13thFloor
@sfwrtr@eldritch.cafe avatar

Ch 10 Nbr 07 — What do you do first when you start a new writing project?

Short fiction intended to be written in one go: I write until it's done or it fails to gel.

Long fiction: I write a treatment or a first chapter to see what happens.

[Author retains copyright (c)2024 R.S.]

and


ixtlidekami, to writing
@ixtlidekami@mstdn.social avatar

#WritersCoffeeClub #Writing 07 What do you do first when you start a new writing project?

I say to myself "Oh, no…not again…"

Then I write. It can be a scene, a character description, a plot thread, worldbuilding, a simple or "complex" idea, a more or less faithful description of the dream that spawned the new project, etc…

Then I repeat to myself "Oh, no…not again…"

=)

gahlearner, to random
@gahlearner@writing.exchange avatar
  1. What do you do first when you start a new writing project?

  2. Start a new Scrivener project.

  • there will be plot ideas, I write those down.
  1. Find names for the MCs and important SCs. If they don't have names, i can't write about them. Minor characters can get placeholders.
  2. Get an idea about the world they're in, get maps and then do some worldbuilding.
  3. Write the first chapter. I need a beginning...
  4. Do research, mainly for SF or contemporary settings.

ashtardeza, to random
@ashtardeza@mas.to avatar

7Jun- What do you do first when you start a new writing project?

I don't decide to start new projects. I get ambushed by ideas while I'm just trying to go about my business. Some of those ideas refuse to leave me alone, and grow into writing projects.

anderlandbooks, to random German

Jun 7
What do you do when you start a new writing project?

In general, I already have some scenes and ideas before I truly sit down and start. Once I know it's going to be more than just a scribble, I make a new folder, a new timeline, other supporting docs. Depending on the topic, I might do some serious research while I daydream about how to put this into my story.

And there are these stories where I simply sit down, write, and realize - oh! This will become a book!

caointeoireacht, to random
@caointeoireacht@turtleisland.rocks avatar

#WritersCoffeeClub 24-06-07: What do you do first when you start a new writing project.

Draw a deep breath then draw the characters words upon the page.
Even if I come back and rearrange the opening brush strokes, I nearly always starts with somebody's words.

The Witch & The Wolf started with Myddra saying
"It's not creatures lurking about at night that scare me. It's the whispers in morning's first light "

Cantata started with Parthia's monologue

The Ballad of Balalaika started with her saying
“When grandmother asks a favour, it's good manners to honour it without questions or demands.”

Lessons Of The Fall started with
Katra thought to herself: “Come on you son of a bastard… Just four more steps so I can see you. Even just your antlers will do. What the fuck are you doing down there anyway‽”

knbrindle, to random
@knbrindle@creativewriting.social avatar

6-6 have I queried?

Yes. I've been querying AMoBaM. A year and 40+ queries later, all I have to show is a handful of partials and several personalized “positive rejections”

I'm mostly given up, and plan to pursue self-pub, though I've got a friend who knows a small publisher, and she's trying to set us up, so I'll see what happens there

The last straw for me was getting a query rejection 13 months after submitting 5 pages. I'm almost 50yo… Don't have that much time to wait

mloxton, to random
@mloxton@med-mastodon.com avatar

June 6th: Have you queried agents for traditional publishing? How did it go?

Very educational.

It was a surprisingly grinding, abusive, and annoying experience, and I left it with a clear understanding that agents are largely a predatory, parasitic, and incompetent crowd who are likely to be replaced by AI that will be no better, but at least a lot faster and cheaper

sfwrtr, (edited ) to Writers
@sfwrtr@eldritch.cafe avatar

Ugh! I found someone had scanned and uploaded a copy of my book to the Internet Archive, without my permission. When wanting to find a review to recommend a book to someone, I found that copyrighted book there, so looked for mine. I still own my copyright. This interferes with me creating an author-preferred edition (instead of the publisher's vision) as planned.

In their terms of service, you will find:

While we collect publicly available Internet documents, sometimes authors and publishers express a desire for their documents not to be included in the Collections (by tagging a file for robot exclusion or by contacting us or the original crawler group). If the author or publisher of some part of the Archive does not want his or her work in our Collections, then we may remove that portion of the Collections without notice.

You can only contact the Internet Archive through email as their telephone number is voicemail. AFAIK their website doesn't list take down procedures.

I have emailed them a takedown demand, with their identifier for my novel, and left the same message on their voicemail.

You may wish to go to https://archive.org/ and find your books, right now.

Please boost so your circle of followers will see this, especially if they are authors.

PS: Yes, they consider themselves a library. I don't mind if they loan an original paperback from Del Rey in paper form. I don't give them permission to scan and then display, or display someone else's scan of my book.




gahlearner, to random
@gahlearner@writing.exchange avatar
  1. Have you queried agents for traditional publishing? How did it go?

I haven't and I don't plan to.

writerobscura, to writing
@writerobscura@writing.exchange avatar

06 Have you queried agents for traditional publishing? How did it go?

Nope, my agent didn't deal with indie comics and so I queried small publishers and was published by them. For a time, I had an agent I got through networking (never querying), but once I was hired as an in-house writer, we parted ways. :)

ixtlidekami, to writing
@ixtlidekami@mstdn.social avatar

06 Have you queried agents for traditional publishing? How did it go?

Negative. And I don't think I'll ever do. My religion forbids such efforts…=)

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