@schmeterpitz@historians.social
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schmeterpitz

@schmeterpitz@historians.social

The official Mastodon account of the podcast "Adventures in Theater History: Philadelphia"!

If you followed us on Twitter, join us here! #theaterhistory #theatrehistory #Philadelphia #theatre #theater #PhillyHistory #phillytheatre

Website: www.aithpodcast.com

This profile is from a federated server and may be incomplete. Browse more on the original instance.

gutenberg_org, to books
@gutenberg_org@mastodon.social avatar

in 1847.

The String of Pearls, probably written by James Malcolm Rymer & Thomas Peckett Prest, concludes its serial publication in the 'penny dreadful' The People's Periodical issued by Edward Lloyd in London, begun in November 1846. This is the first literary appearance of Sweeney Todd. The story was then published in book form in 1850 as "The String of Pearls", subtitled "The Barber of Fleet Street. A Domestic Romance".

The String of Pearls
https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/59828

schmeterpitz,
@schmeterpitz@historians.social avatar

@gutenberg_org It was adapted in to a popular Victorian stage melodrama, and in the 20th century was the inspiration for the Sondheim musical "Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street".

schmeterpitz, to philadelphia
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That January night, the great diva was back in Her longtime fans all gathered at the venue, waiting for her entrance. Would she arrive on time? Now well into her 60s, would she keep her beauty, her style, her charisma for which she was so famous?

It wasn't - not this time - no, it was the great French actress, Sarah , who under an exclusive agreement with the Shubert Brothers, was traveling around America on her "final farewell" tour.

ekknappenberger, to random
@ekknappenberger@mastodon.social avatar

An interesting development in the local theater history of Rockingham, Virginia

@schmeterpitz

schmeterpitz,
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@ekknappenberger Awesome! Always nice to see people willing to ask for community support - as they come out as openly Thespian!

schmeterpitz,
@schmeterpitz@historians.social avatar

@ekknappenberger Sorry, of course - I didn't mean to make light of the historical situation.

gutenberg_org, (edited ) to books
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"One drop of hatred left in the cup of joy turns the most blissful draught into poison."
Schiller: Joan of Arc ; William Tell

German poet and playwright Friedrich Schiller was born in 1759. He is best remembered for such dramas as Die Räuber (1781; The Robbers), the Wallenstein trilogy (1800–01), Maria Stuart (1801), and Wilhelm Tell (1804). via @Britannica

Books by Friedrich Schiller at PG:
https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/author/289

schmeterpitz,
@schmeterpitz@historians.social avatar

@gutenberg_org May we suggest another tag? ! By the early 19th Century his plays were being produced around the world - including here in Philadelphia.

In this painting by the Philadelphia artist Thomas Sully, we can see actor William B. Wood, in the role of Charles De Moor in "The Robbers," which was first played on the New Theatre stage in Philadelphia in February of 1811.

juergen_hubert, to Germany
@juergen_hubert@thefolklore.cafe avatar

: I've been translating a lot of vampire folklore from northeastern Germany as of late. And they are not at all similar to modern media portrayals of the phenomenon.

For starters, they rarely if ever actually leave their graves. Instead, all their "feasting" is usually done via some sort of sympathetic connection to their victims (usually their relatives).

The reason why someone becomes a vampire after death also varies a lot. But the account I am currently translating ("Der Vampyr im Wendlande"/"The Vampyre in the Wendland Region") has a particularly interesting take on this.

You see, people will become vampires if they have been weaned off their mother's breast twice as infants - that is to say, the first attempt at weaning them off mothers' milk didn't take. They must survive to become adults, but then, once they die, they will become vampires. They are also called "Dubbelsüger" or "Doppelsauger" - "Double Sucker" for this reason.

And then, once they are dead, they will sit up in their graves and attempt to suck their own breasts - presumably because they are so used to sucking breasts during their infancy. And this "sucking" is then somehow transferred to their next of kin, who will become pale, scrawnly, and weak until they finally die.

Quite a difference to the usual Anne Rice-type vampire, isn't it?

(Incidentally, I will publish the full translation of this account on my Patreon page this December.)


https://books.google.de/books?id=DYlUAAAAcAAJ&pg=PA924#v=onepage&q&f=false

schmeterpitz,
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@juergen_hubert Yes! That explains Colin Robinson completely!

schmeterpitz, to philadelphia
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Drove across the Strawberry Mansion Bridge on my way home through West Fairmount Park today. Thought about how this whole area was seriously in the running to be the site of the United Nations, once.

RollingStone, to random

Ron DeSantis is cracking down on education in Florida, and now some schools are cutting back on Shakespeare to comply with the governor’s expansive slate of restrictions. https://www.rollingstone.com/politics/politics-news/shakespeare-cut-florida-schools-desantis-agenda-1234802500/

schmeterpitz,
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@RollingStone "The schools previously required students to read two of Shakespeare’s novels or plays, in their entirety, per year."

Shakespeare wrote novels? I sure never learned THAT in school! What ELSE were they keeping from me?

Deglassco, to history

Paul Robeson’s courage in front of the House Un-American Activities Committee made him a symbol of resistance for subsequent generations of civil rights activists & dissenters, who saw in his actions a model of courage in the face of political intimidation. He stood firm for his beliefs, despite the significant cost, and pushed back against the violation of civil liberties.

https://youtu.be/VhnCrHZkgNk

1/

@blackmastodon @BlackMastodon #BlackMastodon #Histodons #History #StillWeRise #BlackHistory

schmeterpitz,
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@Deglassco Amazing thread! Even though I thought I already knew both men's stories quite well, I learned a lot. Thank you!

schmeterpitz,
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@Deglassco I believe that's not quite correct - Robeson certainly lived at his sister's home in Philly, but when he suffered a stroke in late December '75, he was taken to Presbyterian-University of Pennsylvania Medical Center nearby. He died in that hospital four weeks later.
Inquirer, January 24, 1976:

Deglassco, (edited ) to history

When they were called before the House Un-American Activities Committee, athletes Jackie Robinson and Paul Robeson were compelled to advocate for the loyalty, value, and patriotism of Black Americans to a predominantly white society riddled with pervasive racial prejudice. As symbolic representatives for the entire Black community, they bore a burden heavy with expectations and public scrutiny.

1/

@blackmastodon @BlackMastodon

schmeterpitz,
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@Deglassco Looking forward to this thread on Paul Robeson! Here is our own blog post (that accompanies our podcast episode) about Paul Robeson in Philadelphia, where he spent his final years: https://www.aithpodcast.com/blog/the-house-i-live-in/

JMMontpelier, to philadelphia

#OTD 1805 #DolleyMadison went to #Philadelphia for an ulcerated tumor on her knee: “Doct. Physick has seen it, & says he will cure me in a month.” Dr. Philip Syng Physick immobilized the knee with splints and used caustics to destroy the tumor, avoiding surgery.
📸Public domain, Wikimedia Commons.

#sschat #histodons #HistoryTeacher #apgov #ushistory @academicchatter

schmeterpitz,
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@JMMontpelier @academicchatter
The aptly named Dr. Physick'! His house still stands as a historic site in Philly!

gutenberg_org, to books
@gutenberg_org@mastodon.social avatar

"[U]n honnête homme n'est ni français, ni allemand, ni espagnol, il est Citoyen du Monde et sa patrie est partout."
Lettre contre les frondeurs, 1631

Savinien de Cyrano de Bergerac died in 1655. He is best known as the inspiration for Edmond Rostand's most noted drama, Cyrano de Bergerac (1897), which, although it includes elements of his life, also contains invention and myth. via @wikipedia

Books by Cyrano de Bergerac at PG:
https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/author/43842

Frontispice de l’Histoire comique contenant les États et empires de la Lune dans le tome II des Œuvres de Monsieur de Cyrano Bergerac éditées par Jacques Desbordes, à Amsterdam, en 1709. Le narrateur s'élève dans les cieux grâce à des fioles de rosée.

schmeterpitz,
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@gutenberg_org - In 1994, two Philadelphia theaters - the Walnut Street Theatre and the Wilma Theater - found they had both scheduled productions of "Cyrano" for their seasons. They decided to collaborate on a joint production instead.

Canadian actor Alan Scarfe as Cyrano, Peter Bradbury was Christian, and Philadelphia actress Susan Wilder as Roxanne. The production budget was set for over half a million dollars, and the subscribers for both theaters were accommodated in an extended run.

skyfaller, to Hair
@skyfaller@jawns.club avatar

Suppose I generally like having on my face and body. Perhaps it's because I want society to perceive me as a man, since boys and women tend to have difficulty growing such hair.

Is there any reason to have hair on my neck? What purpose does it serve? Can I just remove it permanently?

When was the last time were considered fashionable or attractive? Is it likely to ever happen again? If they did become trendy again, would I want to be fashionable under such conditions?

schmeterpitz,
@schmeterpitz@historians.social avatar

@skyfaller
I know, right?

schmeterpitz, to Theatre
@schmeterpitz@historians.social avatar

June 22, 1936: The demolition of the Arch Street began.

The former home of thousands of plays and players had stood on the north side of Arch, just west of 6th Street, since 1828. Developers had bought it, and it was leveled to become a mere parking lot.

But . . . what happened to the statue of Apollo, by sculptor Nicholas Gevelot, on the facade?

I would deeply appreciate it if anybody out there can help me solve this .

schmeterpitz,
@schmeterpitz@historians.social avatar

@skyfaller
Thanks! Will add to photo

schmeterpitz, to Theatre
@schmeterpitz@historians.social avatar

June 21, 1876: The comedian E.A. Sothern brought Lord Dundreary and his famous whiskers to Philadelphia, in "Our American Cousin" and other plays at the Walnut Street .

However, the Philadelphia summer heat was brutal, and Sothern evidently suffered, like many other visitors to the Exposition, when he had gone out to view the fairgrounds.

By the end of July, with both his health and his audiences faltering, Sothern called it quits, and other actors were booked to complete the summer.

ekknappenberger, to random
@ekknappenberger@mastodon.social avatar

if there was social media in 1860, there would be a status box for "slavery"

most northerners would select "prefer not to say" and most southerners "it's complicated"

schmeterpitz,
@schmeterpitz@historians.social avatar

@ekknappenberger Though undoubtably Black people on this theoretical social media of 1860 - whether in the North or South - would have no trouble selecting "Abolish."

ekknappenberger, to random
@ekknappenberger@mastodon.social avatar

we could avoid all problems of the past without exception if only historians were required by law get a philosophy degree before they were allowed to study history

schmeterpitz,
@schmeterpitz@historians.social avatar

@ekknappenberger Yes indeed! . . . And then they must also marry a theater critic, like this guy! https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karl_Marx

davidrevoy, to random
@davidrevoy@framapiaf.org avatar

Tried to install cat on Windows. Failed, instruction unclear.

schmeterpitz,
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@davidrevoy Under-boosted toot.

Deglassco, to random

Originally shot in Black and White, here is the colorized version of The Nicholas Brothers in one of the GREATEST dance sequences ever performed!

From the 1943 film, “Stormy Weather,” the clip also features Cab Calloway and Orchestra playing “Jumpin’ Jive.”

Childhood prodigies, The Nicholas Brothers don’t get nearly the recognition they deserve. They were truly astonishing to behold!

https://youtu.be/IoMbeDhG9fU

schmeterpitz,
@schmeterpitz@historians.social avatar

@Deglassco Philadelphia's own Nicholas Brothers! Their parents were in the band at the Standard Theatre on South Street, and they grew up watching and learning from all the great dancers that came through town. Their trademark move – a jump ending in a deep split – was inspired by a dancer named Jack Wiggins.

schmeterpitz,
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@Deglassco Another great Philly tap dancer was Pearl Bailey's brother Bill. He is sometimes seen on a viral video of him doing his signature move - later popularized by Michael Jackson as The Moonwalk.

He left dancing for the ministry, and due to his drug addiction had a rough time of it in the 50s, but later in life, he returned to Philly and raised a large family.

schmeterpitz,
@schmeterpitz@historians.social avatar

@Deglassco You're welcome! I enjoy your extended threads so much.

Here's my own longer version of Bill Bailey's story on our podcast's Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/AITHpodcast/posts/pfbid0ayZBpahDuNXjQXEcn9sSnicpq6MWP1hpPyRpLNFdS87CdnaJXczCZNhfB1WTc4e1l

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