kevinctofel, (edited ) to ai
@kevinctofel@hachyderm.io avatar

Would you pay a monthly fee for a smarter, #AI-enabled #Alexa from #Amazon?

I would not as I barely use Alexa these days at all even though as a former #IoT content creator, I have all of the “big tech” assistants in my home. Not because Alexa today is lackluster compared to other options IMO, but I’ve given enough (read: too much) of my personal data to Amazon already.

https://www.cnbc.com/2024/05/22/amazon-plans-to-give-alexa-an-ai-overhaul-monthly-subscription-price.html

aallan, to security
@aallan@mastodon.social avatar
icd, to ai Polish
@icd@mastodon.internet-czas-dzialac.pl avatar

W ostatnim odcinku pierwszego sezonu ICD Weekend Arek i Kuba opowiadają o newsach dotyczacych Facebooka, Apple i AI oraz dzielą się nowymi rekomendacjami aplikacji z F-Droida.

https://www.internet-czas-dzialac.pl/weekend-25/

davidgs, to AWS
@davidgs@tty0.social avatar
CenturyAvocado, to Cybersecurity
@CenturyAvocado@fosstodon.org avatar

Hot damn.... Consumer VDSL/Ethernet WiFi router.. "[Security] Set SSID of Wireless to ";reboot" will cause CPE reboot until reset to default."
What if I set the SSID to ";rm -rf /" ;)

Such secure, many best.

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donwatkins, to ai
@donwatkins@fosstodon.org avatar
mmeier, to homelab
@mmeier@social.mei-home.net avatar

I've got an idea. Let's form an IoT company. One that makes really great, high quality, well designed products. You know, ones that don't drop out every time you look at them wrong. We offer them cheap, burning through some VC money.

We will certainly fail. But for one glorious moment, people will know good IoT. And the next time somebody tries to sell them crap, they get beaten to a pulp with their shitty products.

And perhaps then, we will actually get good IoT stuff.

pimterry, to homeassistant
@pimterry@toot.cafe avatar

Spent some of the weekend playing with Arduinos + Home Assistant (@homeassistant) to keep a better eye on my plants. Even though it's C++, it's so refreshing compared to shipping modern prod code!

Single file, no tests, no 3rd party dependencies, no infra, just run code & see results immediately (if it works, it's done). And with deep sleep the result should keep running on battery for years untouched. Super fun! ✨

psoul, (edited ) to climate
@psoul@sfba.social avatar

My landlord installed a heatpump / electric combo water heater last month. It has a wifi connectivity feature that supposedly lets you schedule the water heater.

I was excited to be able to turn it off during peak times (4 to 9pm) and at night and set it to high efficiency mode when needed.

1/4

psoul, (edited )
@psoul@sfba.social avatar

We have three types of days at the house: weekend, weekday work at home, week day in the office.

But guess what? PG&E locked the schedule feature!!!

“Your water heater schedule has been set by your utility for best energy savings. Any changes will be effective for 72 hours.”

Excuse me?

2/4

psoul,
@psoul@sfba.social avatar

We all know that PG&E is a private utility company which participates in stock buyback, unjustified rate increases coupled with unrealistic compensations for their CEO.

I know they don’t have me best interest in mind yet I cannot opt out if them scheduling my water heater…
My only option is to turn off the IoT and delete the app.

Are appliance manufacturers are colluding with utility companies ?

Why is IoT so shitty?

3/4

psoul,
@psoul@sfba.social avatar

So once again, as a tenant, I can’t do anything. My landlord probably got some tax deductions, and we’re stuck with either a dumb water heater or a collaborator spyware smart water heater…

At least it should theoretically be cheaper than gas but with the way the rates are increasing, I need to do the math

Don’t buy an or at least download the app beforehand to see how shitty it is.

4/4

nixCraft, to security
@nixCraft@mastodon.social avatar

UK becomes first country to ban default bad passwords on IoT devices https://therecord.media/united-kingdom-bans-defalt-passwords-iot-devices

olimex, to esp32
@olimex@mastodon.social avatar

ESP32-POE2 open source hardware board offers WiFi, Bluetooth, Wired Ethernet and POE up to 25W power for external circuits and sensors. https://olimex.wordpress.com/2024/04/25/esp32-poe2-open-source-hardware-poe-iot-board-provides-up-to-25w-power-supply-to-external-circuits/

deflockcom, to fedora
@deflockcom@mastodon.social avatar

@fedora #Fedora 40 #IOT will be my first #immutable OS for my home #server (in hope to have the same experience i have with the VM i use (#Silverblue) that give me a 2 #commands #upgrade each version.

If i where writing a letter to them (maybe since i mentioned them) i would ask an #easier way to auto update #podman #container.

And a #native (auto #decryption) of the #OS using #TPM ship (i know the tuto on fedora magazine but sometimes it fail i woule prefer native one).

Taffer, to homeassistant
@Taffer@mastodon.gamedev.place avatar

This Open Home Foundation thing sounds a bit like one of my "startup ideas that would never get funded"; ideally this will end up being an IoT ecosystem that's open and self-hostable. https://www.openhomefoundation.org/

I initially ignored it because I thought "Home Assistant" was the Apple IoT thing.

remixtures, to Cybersecurity Portuguese
@remixtures@tldr.nettime.org avatar

: "For a start, review all the devices in your home that connect to the internet. Try to identify AI-powered features, such as learning user behaviours or processing large datasets. These are common in smart speakers, home security systems and advanced wearable technology.

Secondly, explore the functionality of your devices and disable irrelevant or unnecessary AI features. This simple step could prevent AI from gathering personal information and its possible exposure.

Thirdly, when you purchase a device, examine the manufacturer’s security disclosure, often found on their website under titles like “Privacy”, “Security” or “Product Support”. It can also be found in user manuals and, sometimes, directly on the product packaging.

Make sure you understand what sort of AI technology the device uses and how data is collected, processed, stored and protected. What are the safeguards? Did the manufacturer use industry standards or subscribe to strong security guidelines like the European Union’s data protection regulation, GDPR?" https://theconversation.com/ai-is-making-smart-devices-watches-speakers-doorbells-easier-to-hack-heres-how-to-stay-safe-223738

eurafri, to Catroventos German
@eurafri@mastodon.ctseuro.com avatar
9to5linux, to linux
@9to5linux@floss.social avatar

#Linux Weekly Roundup for April 14th, 2024: #Ubuntu 24.04 LTS enters public beta testing, #EndeavourOS devs need #ARM branch maintainer, explicit sync merged in #Xwayland and KWin, #GParted Live patched against XZ backdoor, #OpenSSL 3.3, Ubuntu Pro for #IoT devices, new #KDE Gear and Frameworks releases, new all #AMD Linux #gaming laptop, updated #ArchLinux installer, and more https://9to5linux.com/9to5linux-weekly-roundup-april-14th-2024

#OpenSource #FOSS

ricci, to security
@ricci@discuss.systems avatar

Hey! Let's talk about #SSH and #security!

If you've ever looked at SSH server logs you know what I'm about to say: Any SSH server connected to the public Internet is getting bombarded by constant attempts to log in. Not just a few of them. A lot of them. Sometimes even dozens per second. And this problem is not going away; it is, in fact, getting worse. And attackers' behavior is changing.

The graph attached to this post shows the number of attempted SSH logins per day to one of @cloudlab s clusters over a four-year period. It peaks at about 3.4 million login attempts per day.

This is part of a study we did on our production system, using logs of more than 640 million login attempts, covering more than 1,500 hosts on our side and observing more than 840 thousand incoming IP addresses.

A paper presenting our analysis and a new, highly effective means to block SSH brute force attacks ("Where The Wild Things Are: Brute-Force SSH Attacks In The Wild And How To Stop Them") will be presented next week at #NSDI24 by @sachindhke . The full paper is at https://www.flux.utah.edu/paper/singh-nsdi24

Let's dive in. 🧵

ricci,
@ricci@discuss.systems avatar

First things first: everyone "knows" that most brute force attacks are against the "root" account, right? This is certainly what earlier studies have found.

As it turns out, this used to be true, but it's not anymore. This graph shows that the fraction of brute force attacks using the username root was nearly 100% back in 2017, but it's been falling - by mid-2021, only around 20% off the attacks we saw were against root.

So, why? Well, we don't have a hotline to the attackers, but we have an educated guess from our own data and from many others' reporting: a lot of the usernames we see correspond to default usernames for #network #routers, specific #Linux distributions, specific server software, and #IoT devices. Basically, as we connect ever more stuff to the Internet (and generally try to protect the "root" account), attackers seem to be diversifying the accounts they are going after.

(There's a table of the top 100 usernames in the paper.)

9to5linux, to ubuntu
@9to5linux@floss.social avatar
Edent, to fediverse
@Edent@mastodon.social avatar

🆕 blog! “The Fediverse of Things”

One of the most frustrating things in modern technology is the effort spent trying to artificially restrict abundance. Take, for example, this tale from museum-worker Aaron Cope: I was out with a friend who worked for Twitter and I asked them whether it would be possible for the museum to “create 200,000 Twitter accounts, one […]

👀 Read more: https://shkspr.mobi/blog/2024/04/the-fediverse-of-things/

steve,
@steve@social.technoetic.com avatar

Inspired by the article written by @Edent on the Fediverse of Things (#iot, #wot), I experimented with using an LLM to interpret home automation requests that could be sent using #ActivityPub and convert them to JSON device commands. I documented the results in the following blog article:
https://www.stevebate.net/fediverse-of-things-and-llms/

blog, to fediverse
@blog@shkspr.mobi avatar

The Fediverse of Things
https://shkspr.mobi/blog/2024/04/the-fediverse-of-things/

One of the most frustrating things in modern technology is the effort spent trying to artificially restrict abundance.

Take, for example, this tale from museum-worker Aaron Cope:

I was out with a friend who worked for Twitter and I asked them whether it would be possible for the museum to “create 200,000 Twitter accounts, one for each object in the Cooper Hewitt’s collection”. My friend looked at me for a moment, laughed, and then simply said: No.

In that blog post, Aaron reveals that the San Francisco International Airport Museum is using ActivityPub to create automated social-media bot accounts for all its exhibits and, possibly, every object it hold.

And why not! That would be close to impossible to do on a centralised service. But on a decentralised service under your own control, it is relatively simple. Perhaps I only want to follow the museum's canteen, or I just want to engage with a specific artefact. The Fediverse makes that possible.

This reminds me of the Melbourne "treemail" phenomenon. Every tree in the city had an email address, ostensibly so residents could email maintenance issues for a specific tree. Instead, people started interacting with the trees and sending them little love notes!

Dearest Golden Elm Tree, I finally found you! As in I see you everyday on my way to uni, but I had no idea of what kind of tree you are. You are the most beautiful tree in the city and I love you

A few weeks ago, I read about Ben Smith inventing Tweeting trains. With a bit of code, every train line in the UK was suddenly represented on the web in a convenient format. Well… Convenient if you were on Twitter.

Museums, trees, and trains naturally brings me on to the Internet of Things. I think it is fair to say that IoT is in a bit of an odd place right now. Matter is a confusing mishmash of standards. Security and privacy issues dog the simplest devices. Many people don't even want their toaster online!

For the majority of domestic uses, people want an Intranet of Things. There's little need to have your light-bulbs controlled when you're outside of WiFi range. Similarly, it is probably a really bad idea to have your hydroelectric dam connected to the Internet.

Which brings me back to the Fediverse.

On the one hand, it would be nice to be able to follow @Yellow_Line@Transit_Authority.gov - or even @Bus_Stop_1234@bus_company.biz - that would allow for hyperfocused data getting to the right people. It seems feasible that every civic object could have a Fediverse account. From the individual streetlights to the municipal sewerage system. Perhaps people won't send love letters to overflowing drains - but a social-dashboard of your civic environment could be both practical and delightful.

And, as for your domestic gadgets? Why not give every room, or every light-bulb, in your home a private Fediverse account? You could send a message like:

Hey @thermostat, please set the temperature to 19°C. Thanks!

That might be a bit much! But I like the idea of a private social network which consists of all my IoT gadgets talking to me and each other.

https://shkspr.mobi/blog/2024/04/the-fediverse-of-things/

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