@CultureDesk@flipboard.social
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CultureDesk

@CultureDesk@flipboard.social

Welcome to Flipboard’s culture and entertainment picks. You'll find insightful interviews, revealing reviews and thought-provoking features. Posts are handpicked by Flipboard editors. Boosts do not imply endorsement, but are used to highlight posts we think the community might find interesting. #Culture #Entertainment #TheArts #Food

For more culture picks, follow Flipboard's federated Culture Desk (@theculturedesk)

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CultureDesk, to books
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This week, @Flipboard's Good Life newsletter was curated by Jessica Bethel, a photographer and the founder of Literature Noir. She selected her favorite books by Black authors as well as features about the importance of Black librarians, the influence of Octavia Butler, and Antonia Hylton's incredible new book, "Madness: Race and Insanity in a Jim Crow Asylum." Take a look at her curation here.

https://flipboard.com/@4eyedgirl/celebrate-black-history-month-by-reading-black-authors-h648au4c5l1ltlhm

@bookstodon @blackmastodon

CultureDesk, to history
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Words like "periodt," GYAT," "cap" and "drip" have a rich cultural history, and are part of the variety of English known as African American Vernacular English (AAVE). Linguist/cognitive scientist Nicole Holliday talked to TODAY about how AAVE and other language patterns from marginalized communities can take off and eventually be incorporated into the mainstream. “Black people are at the bottom of the social hierarchy,” she says. “So young white people who use African American English have always done it — one, because Black people are cool, and two, because it pisses off their parents.”

https://flip.it/BV62LN

@blackmastodon @histodons

CultureDesk, to Women
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Frances Ellen Watkins Harper — considered the mother of African American journalism — died 113 years ago today. The 19th's HBCU fellowship program is named after her. Here, three fellows — Racquel Bethea, Darreonna Davis and Eshe Ukweli — reflect on her legacy. "Frances offers a perfect lesson in being resolute in your purpose and being unwavering and unbound in how you achieve your life’s mission. She was a woman that knew her truth and authentic gifts could inspire a collective change in others and leave an impact," says Ukweli.

https://flip.it/EZI_Zt

#Women #BlackMastodon @blackmastodon @histodons #History #BlackHistoryMonth #BlackHistory #FrancesEllenWatkinsHarper #Journalism

CultureDesk, to books
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"Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" is a classic movie, but it was nearly a disaster. In a new book, “Cocktails with George and Martha: Movies, Marriage and the Making of ‘Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?,’” Philip Gefter captures what happened behind the scenes. The East Bay Times talked to Gefter about Elizabeth Taylor's behavior, marriage, and why the film continues to resonate.

https://flip.it/yXYDtK

#Books #Bookstodon @bookstodon #Hollywood #Cinema #ElizabethTaylor #RichardBurton

CultureDesk, (edited ) to food
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Restaurants in America are in crisis because they can't hire and retain qualified workers. To stave off oblivion, restaurateurs are exploring options like replacing tipping with mandatory service fees, reducing waitstaff in favor of counter ordering, and dynamic pricing, where you pay more or less according to demand. Business Insider's food reporter Corey Mintz delves into the issues, concluding: "The fundamental problem is that restaurants have long mistreated their workers. So when many veteran employees had a chance to get out of the industry during the pandemic, they did." Which of these solutions would you be prepared to swallow?

https://flip.it/5deQ6c

CultureDesk,
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@luciedigitalni Absolutely — it seems like restaurant owners want customers to provide the money to increase staff wages. Historically, restaurants operate on very thin margins, so perhaps many literally don't have the money to pay people properly without taking some of these measures.

CultureDesk,
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@gpowerf Bullying and mistreatment in the service industry is a huge issue, it's true.

CultureDesk,
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@luciedigitalni @sister_ratched Yes, Corey Mintz has a great quote in the article to sum that up:

"The business model isn’t working and neither is the labor model of 14-hour workdays, last-minute shift changes, and customers deciding how much servers earn. Until restaurants are ready to face that, labor shortages will persist and the experience of eating out will continue to crater."

CultureDesk,
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@luciedigitalni @sister_ratched It's a good one! He wrote a book about it in 2021 — seems like the situation hasn't improved any.

CultureDesk, to Texas
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A Texas judge has ruled that a high school was not violating the CROWN Act by punishing student Darryl George for the length of his dreadlocks. George has been in in-school suspension or at an off-site disciplinary program for most of the school year since August. The school said that George's hair violated a dress code regarding length of boys' hair; the family argued that protective hairstyles — which are covered by the CROWN act — require a certain amount of length. The family plans to appeal the decision.

https://flip.it/TZsQJ6

@blackmastodon
For more stories like this, follow @theculturedesk's Stories of Black America Magazine, @stories.

CultureDesk,
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@AskPippa Interestingly, Rep. Ron Reynolds, who helped write Texas's CROWN act, testified on behalf of Darryl George. He told the court: “Length was inferred with the very nature of the style. Anyone familiar knows it requires a certain amount of length [for most protective styles.]" So it does seem that the judge has gone against the law as intended by the people who created it.

CultureDesk, to television
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TV host Wendy Williams has primary progressive aphasia and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), conditions that affect language, communication, behavior and cognitive function. Bruce Willis' family revealed last year that he has the same kind of dementia. Williams' team announced this ahead of a documentary, "Where is Wendy Williams?" which will be broadcast later this week on Lifetime. Variety has the full statement.

https://flip.it/Y4XgPl

CultureDesk,
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@tmalesys Sorry to hear that — and yes, these stars being open about their conditions will hopefully bring awareness and compassion. Williams' team said that many individuals suffer stigma and misunderstanding, particularly before they have a diagnosis.

CultureDesk, to television
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Of all the 1990s teen shows in all the world, one reigns supreme: "My So-Called Life." It ran for a single season in 1994-95, gave Claire Danes her first Golden Globe, and introduced thousands of girls — and their parents' bath towels — to cherry-red hair dye. Show creator Ed Zwick has just written a memoir, "Hits, Flops and Other Illusions: My Fortysomething Years in Hollywood." Here's an extract, reproduced in MovieMaker magazine, about the development, casting, and cancelation of the iconic '90s show.

https://flip.it/C6K-Z1

For more stories like this, follow @theculturedesk's Culturist Magazine, @the.

CultureDesk,
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@shayz0rz "“We can’t program a show about teenagers,” they said. “They’re just not an important market for our advertisers.” Oh hi from a teenager who bought a plaid shirt so she could look like Angela Chase.

CultureDesk,
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CultureDesk, to books
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West Virginia and Georgia are eyeing laws that would allow criminal charges against school librarians for distributing books that contain "obscene matter." This material often includes books on gender identity and sexual orientation. @axios has created this @Flipboard Storyboard, which also includes information on proposed book bans in Oregon, Florida and Texas.

https://flipboard.com/@axiosnews/librarians-could-face-criminal-charges-over-obscene-books-in-some-states-cjmrjuh6808h1970

@bookstodon

For more stories like this, follow @ElectionCentral's State and Local Magazine, @state

CultureDesk, to Hair
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Black women are prone to certain types of alopecia, which, says dermatologist Dr. Hope Mitchell, can be emotionally painful. “Hair is our creativity. It makes me feel powerful, it makes me feel special and important." The 19th talked to her and other experts about how hair loss conditions can be addressed with respect and sensitivity, so women can feel beautiful again.

https://flip.it/0EaNcu

@blackmastodon

CultureDesk, (edited )
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Meanwhile in Texas, a judge will weigh this week whether a school district near Houston violated the CROWN Act after suspending a Black student for his dreadlocks. The Austin American Statesman has more.

https://flip.it/UZIrJS

@blackmastodon

For more stories like this, follow @theculturedesk's Stories of Black America Magazine, @stories.

CultureDesk, (edited ) to movies
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"Oppenheimer" is nominated for 13 Oscars this year and Christopher Nolan is a frontrunner for Best Director. Here's @IndieWire ranking of his entire filmography, from his debut in 1998 to today. Which of his 12 movies is your favorite (this poll is in order of IndieWire's preference, with "Dunkirk" as the publication's top pick)?

https://flip.it/igGNyk

For more stories like this, follow IndieWire's Film Magazine, @film

CultureDesk,
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@kinsale42 @IndieWire @film We really should have offered a "none of the above" option!

CultureDesk,
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@alfa_vuk "Oppenheimer" is doing very badly in the poll (though not as badly as "Tenet"!).

CultureDesk,
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@CAPETOK El ganador ha estado cambiando entre "Memento" e "Interstellar" desde que publicamos la encuesta. A "Interstellar" ciertamente no le fue tan bien con la crítica como a "Memento", según las partituras de "Rotten Tomatoes".

CultureDesk,
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Our poll voters were decidedly opposed to IndieWire's experts, who deemed "Dunkirk" Christopher Nolan's best film. Just five percent chose that option. "Memento" put up a brave fight, but "Interstellar" was the winner in this poll with 24% of the vote. While the Academy's voters may decide that "Oppenheimer" was the year's Best Picture, the people of Mastodon may disagree: Just one percent chose it as their favorite Nolan movie.

CultureDesk,
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@auzzy Yes, we suppose all the poll really proves is that if there were only Christopher Nolan films nominated for Best Picture, Oppenheimer wouldn't win!

CultureDesk,
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@jahabof1794 Love that idea!

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