Fediverse

cliffwade,
@cliffwade@allthingstech.social avatar

Good morning and happy Sunday

It's the last day of the weekend, so let's all talk about what we have on the agenda for the day today.

I'll be mowing at least 3 out of the 4 lawns we normally mow, and very possibly all 4 of them depending on my one neighbor.

After that, it'll just be resting and relaxing as it's also going to be about 82F here today.

andycarolan,
@andycarolan@social.lol avatar

@cliffwade It's convenient... until it isn't lol

ProfessorFalken,
@ProfessorFalken@allthingstech.social avatar

@cliffwade Im here for it!

pubkit,

PubKit is a free service for ActivityPub developers!

We're eager to launch the beta and help ActivityPub developers test and improve their projects.

Everyone wins when we work together, and we're proud to provide a service that benefits everyone.

https://pubkit.net

lewiscowles1986,
@lewiscowles1986@phpc.social avatar

@pubkit
Finally a pricing page that is perfect 😂

dansup,
@dansup@mastodon.social avatar

Still working on https://pubkit.net

Launching later today in beta 🚀

famfo,
@famfo@chaos.social avatar

@dansup I appreciate your work on pixelfed etc., and I understand how frustrating and time consuming outages are. I have quite a few servers to administrate myself.

I however didn't see these posts because I am mainly looking for activitypub development tools and this is the third posts I've seen with "soon".

I urge you to not try to see the worst in people immediately and jump to conclusions. Hope that clears things up. Feel free to reach out to me privately if not.

dansup,
@dansup@mastodon.social avatar

@famfo Thank you for replying and I'm sorry for jumping to conclusions, as I mentioned in a different post, I've been pretty stressed out and I'm sorry for taking that out on you.

I will do better!

beardedtechguy,
@beardedtechguy@allthingstech.social avatar

Good morning friends of the !

Hope your Sunday is getting off to a good start. Let’s gather for our chat and see what our plans are for the day.

We have church here in a bit. After that will be some school work and relaxing to end the weekend.

cliffwade,
@cliffwade@allthingstech.social avatar

@beardedtechguy Good morning sir and happy Sunday to you!

Enjoy your time at church as well as the school work. Hopefully you get it all done.

fediversereport,
@fediversereport@mastodon.social avatar

New: Last Week in - ep 64

  • the DSA for server admins by @iftas
  • P2P video calls with your fediverse account, with iOS app Sora @sora
  • Full 2-way federation with @Flipboard
  • An escalating fight between the Brazilian government and Musk's X leads to president Lula joining

Read at: https://fediversereport.com/last-week-in-fediverse-ep-64/

operationpuppet,
@operationpuppet@mastodon.content.town avatar

As some of you may have (prematurely) seen, I'm looking at live streaming to soon. Likely some Frankie Play this afternoon, both on https://puppet.zone and our server at https://www.operationpuppet.live.

exclusives!

deadsuperhero,
@deadsuperhero@social.wedistribute.org avatar

So, I’m curious: there’s a growing number of hosting platforms specifically for the #Fediverse. For those involved in this, who are comfortable with answering: is there a particular set of tools you use for managing, monitoring, and spinning up instances?

Are those tools open source?

I’m mainly wondering about whether there’s some kind of open platform / dashboard / infra tools that could serve a particular need for hosting / managing / provisioning Fedi servers, and whether the existing hosts in the space would benefit from a shared project of some sort.

blaise,
@blaise@fosstodon.org avatar

@deadsuperhero
Well, I have been on this soapbox for the past 8 years at least.

Fwiw, @getsentry has excellent dev rel staff and there are some stars who work there (although as I sink into my nap, the only name that springs to mind is Anthony Sottile.).

The folks at @hachyderm have done a lot of research into care & feeding of mastodon servers, so it's feasible to put together an opinionated collection of signals as a default config.

raphael,
@raphael@communick.com avatar

@deadsuperhero @mastohost @stux @spacehost @hosting

Not fully automated yet, but a short description of my setup:

  • Docker Swarm cluster to serve instances
  • Customer support via email / matrix / website / discourse
  • Ansible to deploy/update/decommission customer instances depending on their configuration
  • Logs aggregated via Loki, alerts and observability with Grafana
buru5,
@buru5@mstdn.games avatar

would you like to participate in a #fediverse focused magazine about #videogames nostalgia? do you have a personal connection to any of these games? if so, would you like to write a short piece about it?

  • The Bouncer (PS2)
  • Dark Cloud (PS2)
  • Ultima IX: Ascension (Windows)
  • Star Trek: Starfleet Command Volume II - Empires at War (Windows)
  • Pokemon Stadium 2 (N64)
  • Pokemon Crystal (GBC)
  • Guilty Gear X (Dreamcast)
  • Mario Party 3 (N64)

1/2

buru5,
@buru5@mstdn.games avatar

@jake4480 ok. just let me know what you end up playing and if you can take some screenshots of the game, either digitially or just with a phone camera of the TV you're playing it on, that would be cool. i like to incorporate pictures like that into the magazine when i can; otherwise i'll either a) emulate the game myself and take some screenshots or b) gank some from MobyGames.com or something

jake4480,
@jake4480@c.im avatar

@buru5 absolutely will do. Psyched.

docpop,
@docpop@mastodon.social avatar

I can’t tell you how happy I am to get texts like these from friends. I’m so optimistic about the future of the #fediverse and always excited to talk about it.

The fediverse is still a tricky concept to explain though. I’d love to hear how you like to describe this gestures wildly at ActivityPub/Federation/Mastodon/Threads/AT Protocol/PeerTube to a friend.

grid,
@grid@mastodon.gamedev.place avatar

@docpop I usually say the fediverse is built on ActivityPub, an "open standard" for social media. (Then I might go into how html is the technology that drives the web, but all the different browsers implement various "open standards" for rendering html, or websites would look different between Firefox, Chrome, and Safari.) Mastodon is just one open source implementation of this standard, but there are lots of others! And lots of websites host mastodon, just like word press.

stefan,
@stefan@stefanbohacek.online avatar

@docpop I just like to compare it to email. It lets you connect with anyone regardless of their email address/username.

https://jointhefediverse.net

But the best part about it is that it lets you join and create communities that can be as independent or as interconnected as you want.

pcublogue, French
@pcublogue@pkutalk.com avatar

Their is something weird going on with 😲

Mrfunkedude,
@Mrfunkedude@mastodon.social avatar

@pcublogue Sounds like an issue with that instance. Contact the admin and let them know what happened.

soheb,
@soheb@pkutalk.com avatar

@pcublogue hmm, I got an email saying that PeerTube needs to be updated. Maybe I should get onto that

stefan,
@stefan@stefanbohacek.online avatar

Fedilab, a "multifunctional Android client to access the distributed Fediverse" is now free on Google Play.

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=app.fedilab.android

More about the app: https://fedilab.app

Announcement: https://toot.fedilab.app/@apps/112260069194980512

stefan,
@stefan@stefanbohacek.online avatar

@jake4480 Definitely nice to have a variety of apps to try!

jake4480,
@jake4480@c.im avatar

@stefan True. I do like the cross platform/type thing all in one app. That's a big plus.

tallship,

Okay I thought I'd share this recent post here on the #Fediverse. To give it some context, it's an answer to a common question, often a misunderstanding (even by many knowledgeable folks) as to just how we got here.

So first, the question, posed HERE.

And my answer follows below:

There's a lot of apples and oranges here. And everyone had a lot of good points made, but your question is simple, and has a very simple answer. I'll endeavor to address that directly, but do need to tend to some of what has already been said.

Scroll down to the tl;dr for the succinct answer of your question

Ethernet, ARCNET, Token Ring, Thick net (RG-59), Thin net (RG-58 A/U), and UTP (Cat 3, Cat 5, and Cat 6 unshielded twisted pair, Etc.) really have zero bearing on your question insofar as IP is concerned. All of these specifications relate to the definition of technologies that, although are indeed addressed in the OSI model which is indeed very much in use to this day,but are outside the scope of Internet Protocol. I'll come back to this in a minute.

It's quite common to say TCP/IP, but really, it's just IP. For example, we have TCP ports and we have UDP ports in firewalling. i.e., TCP is Transmission Control Protocol and handles the delivery of data in the form of packets. IP handles the routing itself so those messages can arrive to and from the end points. Uniform Data Protocol is another delivery system that does not guarantee arrival but operates on a best effort basis, while TCP is much chattier as it guarantees delivery and retransmission of missed packets - UDP is pretty efficient but in the case of say, a phone call, a packet here and there won't be missed by the human ear.

That's a very simplistic high level-view that will only stand up to the most basic of scrutiny, but this isn't a class on internetworking ;) If you just want to be able to understand conceptually, my definition will suffice.

Networking (LAN) topologies like Token Ring, ARCNET, and Ethernet aren't anywhere in the IP stack, but figure prominently in the OSI stack. I'm not going to go into the details of how these work, or the physical connection methods used like Vampire Taps, Thin net, or twisted pair with RJ-45 terminators, but their relationship will become obvious in a moment.

The OSI model unfolds like so, remember this little mnemonic to keep it straight so you always know:

> People Don't Need To See Paula Abdul

Okay, touched on already, but not really treated, is the description of that little memory aid.

> Physical, Data Link, Network, Transport, Session, Presentation, and Application layers (From bottom to top).

The physical and Data Link layers cover things like the cabling methods described above,and you're probably familiar with MAC Addresses (medium access control) on NICs (network interface controller). These correlate to the first two layers of the OSI stack, namely, the Physical (obvious - you can touch it), and the Data Link layer - how each host's NIC and switches on each LAN segment talk to each other and decide which packets are designated for whom (People Don't).

In software engineering, we're concerned mostly with the Session, Presentation, and Application layers (See Paula Abdul). Detailed explanation of these top three layers is outside the scope of this discussion.

The Beauty of the OSI model is that each layer on one host (or program) talks to exclusively with the same layer of the program or hardware on the other host it is communicating with - or so it believes it is, because, as should be obvious, is has to pass its information down the stack to the next layer below itself, and then when it arrives at the other host, it passes that information back up the stack until it reaches the very top (Abdul) of the stack - the application.

Not all communication involves all of the stacks. At the LAN (Local Area Network) level, we're mostly concerned with the Physical and Data Link layers - we're just trying to get some packet that we aren't concerned about the contents of from one box to another. But that packet probably includes information that goes all the way up the stack.

For instance, NIC #1 has the MAC: 00:b0:d0:63:c2:26 and NIC #2 has a MAC of 00:00:5e:c0:53:af. There's communication between these two NICs over the Ethernet on this LAN segment. One says I have a packet for 00:00:5e:c0:53:af and then two answers and says, "Hey that's me!" Nobody else has that address on the LAN, so they don't answer and stop listening for the payload.

Now for Internet Protocol (IP) and TCP/UDP (Transmission Control Protocol and User Datagram Protocol):

IP corresponds to Layer 3 (Need) - the Network Layer of the **OSI Model.

TCP and UDP correspond to Layer 4 (To) - the Transport Layer of the OSI model.

That covers the entire OSI model and how TCP/IP correspond to it - almost. You're not getting off that easy today.

There's actually a bit of conflation and overlapping there. Just like in real life, it's never that cut and dried. For that, we have the following excellent explanation and drill down thanks to Julia Evans:

  • Layer 2 (Don't) corresponds to Ethernet.
  • Layer 3 (Need) corresponds to IP.
  • Layer 4 (To) corresponds to TCP or UDP (or ICMP etc)
  • Layer 7 (Abdul) corresponds to whatever is inside the TCP or UDP packet (for example a DNS query)

You may wish to give her page a gander for just a bit more of a deeper dive.

Now let's talk about what might be a bit of a misconception on the part of some, or at least, a bit of a foggy conflation between that of the specification of the OSI model and a Company called Bolt Beranek & Newman (BBN) a government contractor tasked with developing the IP stack networking code.

The TCP/IP you know and depend upon today wasn't written by them, and to suggest that it was the OSI model that was scrapped instead of BBN's product is a bit of a misunderstanding. As you can see from above, the OSI model is very much alive and well, and factors into your everyday life, encompasses software development and communications, device manufacturing and engineering, as well as routing and delivery of information.

This next part is rather opinionated, and the way that many of us choose to remember our history of UNIX, the ARPANET, the NSFnet, and the Internet:

The IP stack you know and use everyday was fathered by Bill Joy, who arrived at UC Berkeley in (IIRC) 1974), created vi because ed just wasn't cutting it when he wanted a full screen editor to write Berkeley UNIX (BSD), including TCP/IP, and co-founded Sun Microsystems (SunOS / Solaris):

> Bill Joy just didn’t feel like this (the BBN code) was as efficient as he could do if he did it himself. And so Joy just rewrote it. Here the stuff was delivered to him, he said, “That’s a bunch of junk,” and he redid it. There was no debate at all. He just unilaterally redid it.

Because UNIX was hitherto an AT&T product, and because government contracting has always been rife with interminable vacillating and pontificating, BBN never actually managed to produce code for the the IP stack that could really be relied upon. In short, it kinda sucked. Bad.

I highly recommend that you take a look at this excellent resource explaining the OSI model.

tl;dr:

So! You've decided to scroll down and skip all of the other stuff to get the straight dope on the answer to your question. Here it is:

> What were the major things that caused TCP/IP to become the internet standard protocol?

The ARPANET (and where I worked, what was to become specifically the MILNET portion of that) had a mandate to replace NCP (Network Control Protocol) with IP (Internet Protocol). We did a dry run and literally over two thirds of the Internet (ARPANET) at that time disappeared, because people are lazy, software has bugs, you name it. There were lots of reasons. But that only lasted the better part of a day for the most part.

At that time the ARPANET really only consisted of Universities, big Defense contractors and U.S. Military facilities. Now, if you'll do a bit of digging around, you'll discover that there was really no such thing as NCP - that is, for the most part, what the film industry refers to as a retcon, meaning that we, as an industry, retroactively went back and came up with a way to explain away replacing a protocol that didn't really exist - a backstory, if you will. Sure, there was NCP, it was mostly a kludge of heterogeneous management and communications programs that varied from system to system, site to site, with several commonalities and inconsistencies that were hobbled together with bailing twine, coat hangers, and duct tape (for lack of a better metaphor).

So we really, really, needed something as uniform and ubiquitous as the promise that Internet Protocol would deliver. Because Bill Joy and others had done so much work at UC Berkeley, we actually had 4.1BSD (4.1a) to work with on our DEC machinery. As a junior member of my division, in both age and experience, I was given the task of, let's say throwing the switch on some of our machines, so to speak, when we cut over from the NCP spaghetti and henceforth embraced TCP/IP no matter what, on Flag Day - 01 January 1983.

So you see,the adoption of Internet Protocol was not a de facto occurrence - it was de jure, a government mandate to occur at a specific time on a specific day.

It literally had nothing to do with popularity or some kind of organic adoption, the erroneously described, so-called demise of the OSI model, or any physical network topology.

DARPA said 01 January 1983 and that's it, and that was it - Flag Day.

Sure, it took a few days for several facilities to come up (anyone not running IP was summarily and unceremoniously cut off from the ARPANET).

And one also needs to consider that it wasn't every machine - we only had some machines that were Internet hosts. We still had a lot of mainframes and mini computers, etc., that were interconnected within our facilities in a hodgepodge or some other fashion. Nowadays we have a tendency to be somewhat incredulous if every device doesn't directly connect over IP to the Internet in some way. That wasn't the case back then - you passed traffic internally, sometimes by unmounting tapes from one machine and mounting them on another.

There was a lot of hand wringing, stress, boatloads of frustration, and concern by people over keeping their jobs all over the world. But that's why and when it happened. Six months later in the UNIX portions of networks we had much greater stability with the release of 4.2BSD, but it wouldn't really be until a few years later Net2 was released that things settled down with the virtually flawless networking stability that we enjoy today.

Enjoy!

#tallship #DARPA #IP #Internet_Protocol #Computer_History #internetworking #Internet #ARPANET #MILNET #NSFnet #Bill_Joy #BBN #UNIX #BSD

.

tallship,
@tallship@social.sdf.org avatar
tallship,

The question posed was:

What were the major things that caused TCP/IP to become the internet standard protocol?

This had to be addressed, with so many people piling on and choosing that the OSI model was replaced by TCP/IP because it worked better and increased in popularity

Nothing could be further from the truth.

https://public.mitra.social/users/tallshiptallship wrote the following post Sat, 13 Apr 2024 17:34:29 +0000

DARPA Logo Defense Advanced Projects Administration
Okay I thought I'd share this recent post here on the . To give it some context, it's an answer to a common question, often a misunderstanding (even by many knowledgeable folks) as to just how we got here.

So first, the question, posed HERE.

And my answer follows below:

There's a lot of apples and oranges here. And everyone had a lot of good points made, but your question is simple, and has a very simple answer. I'll endeavor to address that directly, but do need to tend to some of what has already been said.

Scroll down to the tl;dr for the succinct answer of your question

Ethernet, ARCNET, Token Ring, Thick net (RG-59), Thin net (RG-58 A/U), and UTP (Cat 3, Cat 5, and Cat 6 unshielded twisted pair, Etc.) really have zero bearing on your question insofar as IP is concerned. All of these specifications relate to the definition of technologies that, although are indeed addressed in the OSI model which is indeed very much in use to this day,but are outside the scope of Internet Protocol. I'll come back to this in a minute.

It's quite common to say TCP/IP, but really, it's just IP. For example, we have TCP ports and we have UDP ports in firewalling. i.e., TCP is Transmission Control Protocol and handles the delivery of data in the form of packets. IP handles the routing itself so those messages can arrive to and from the end points. Uniform Data Protocol is another delivery system that does not guarantee arrival but operates on a best effort basis, while TCP is much chattier as it guarantees delivery and retransmission of missed packets - UDP is pretty efficient but in the case of say, a phone call, a packet here and there won't be missed by the human ear.

That's a very simplistic high level-view that will only stand up to the most basic of scrutiny, but this isn't a class on internetworking ;) If you just want to be able to understand conceptually, my definition will suffice.

Networking (LAN) topologies like Token Ring, ARCNET, and Ethernet aren't anywhere in the IP stack, but figure prominently in the OSI stack. I'm not going to go into the details of how these work, or the physical connection methods used like Vampire Taps, Thin net, or twisted pair with RJ-45 terminators, but their relationship will become obvious in a moment.

The OSI model unfolds like so, remember this little mnemonic to keep it straight so you always know:

> People Don't Need To See Paula Abdul

Okay, touched on already, but not really treated, is the description of that little memory aid.

> Physical, Data Link, Network, Transport, Session, Presentation, and Application layers (From bottom to top).

The physical and Data Link layers cover things like the cabling methods described above,and you're probably familiar with MAC Addresses (medium access control) on NICs (network interface controller). These correlate to the first two layers of the OSI stack, namely, the Physical (obvious - you can touch it), and the Data Link layer - how each host's NIC and switches on each LAN segment talk to each other and decide which packets are designated for whom (People Don't).

In software engineering, we're concerned mostly with the Session, Presentation, and Application layers (See Paula Abdul). Detailed explanation of these top three layers is outside the scope of this discussion.

The Beauty of the OSI model is that each layer on one host (or program) talks to exclusively with the same layer of the program or hardware on the other host it is communicating with - or so it believes it is, because, as should be obvious, is has to pass its information down the stack to the next layer below itself, and then when it arrives at the other host, it passes that information back up the stack until it reaches the very top (Abdul) of the stack - the application.

Not all communication involves all of the stacks. At the LAN (Local Area Network) level, we're mostly concerned with the Physical and Data Link layers - we're just trying to get some packet that we aren't concerned about the contents of from one box to another. But that packet probably includes information that goes all the way up the stack.

For instance, NIC #1 has the MAC: 00:b0:d0:63:c2:26 and NIC #2 has a MAC of 00:00:5e:c0:53:af. There's communication between these two NICs over the Ethernet on this LAN segment. One says I have a packet for 00:00:5e:c0:53:af and then two answers and says, "Hey that's me!" Nobody else has that address on the LAN, so they don't answer and stop listening for the payload.

Now for Internet Protocol (IP) and TCP/UDP (Transmission Control Protocol and User Datagram Protocol):

IP corresponds to Layer 3 (Need) - the Network Layer of the **OSI Model.

TCP and UDP correspond to Layer 4 (To) - the Transport Layer of the OSI model.

That covers the entire OSI model and how TCP/IP correspond to it - almost. You're not getting off that easy today.

There's actually a bit of conflation and overlapping there. Just like in real life, it's never that cut and dried. For that, we have the following excellent explanation and drill down thanks to Julia Evans:

  • Layer 2 (Don't) corresponds to Ethernet.
  • Layer 3 (Need) corresponds to IP.
  • Layer 4 (To) corresponds to TCP or UDP (or ICMP etc)
  • Layer 7 (Abdul) corresponds to whatever is inside the TCP or UDP packet (for example a DNS query)

You may wish to give her page a gander for just a bit more of a deeper dive.

Now let's talk about what might be a bit of a misconception on the part of some, or at least, a bit of a foggy conflation between that of the specification of the OSI model and a Company called Bolt Beranek & Newman (BBN) a government contractor tasked with developing the IP stack networking code.

The TCP/IP you know and depend upon today wasn't written by them, and to suggest that it was the OSI model that was scrapped instead of BBN's product is a bit of a misunderstanding. As you can see from above, the OSI model is very much alive and well, and factors into your everyday life, encompasses software development and communications, device manufacturing and engineering, as well as routing and delivery of information.

This next part is rather opinionated, and the way that many of us choose to remember our history of UNIX, the ARPANET, the NSFnet, and the Internet:

The IP stack you know and use everyday was fathered by Bill Joy, who arrived at UC Berkeley in (IIRC) 1974), created vi because ed just wasn't cutting it when he wanted a full screen editor to write Berkeley UNIX (BSD), including TCP/IP, and co-founded Sun Microsystems (SunOS / Solaris):

> Bill Joy just didn’t feel like this (the BBN code) was as efficient as he could do if he did it himself. And so Joy just rewrote it. Here the stuff was delivered to him, he said, “That’s a bunch of junk,” and he redid it. There was no debate at all. He just unilaterally redid it.

Because UNIX was hitherto an AT&T product, and because government contracting has always been rife with interminable vacillating and pontificating, BBN never actually managed to produce code for the the IP stack that could really be relied upon. In short, it kinda sucked. Bad.

I highly recommend that you take a look at this excellent resource explaining the OSI model.

tl;dr:

So! You've decided to scroll down and skip all of the other stuff to get the straight dope on the answer to your question. Here it is:

> What were the major things that caused TCP/IP to become the internet standard protocol?

The ARPANET (and where I worked, what was to become specifically the MILNET portion of that) had a mandate to replace NCP (Network Control Protocol) with IP (Internet Protocol). We did a dry run and literally over two thirds of the Internet (ARPANET) at that time disappeared, because people are lazy, software has bugs, you name it. There were lots of reasons. But that only lasted the better part of a day for the most part.

At that time the ARPANET really only consisted of Universities, big Defense contractors and U.S. Military facilities. Now, if you'll do a bit of digging around, you'll discover that there was really no such thing as NCP - that is, for the most part, what the film industry refers to as a retcon, meaning that we, as an industry, retroactively went back and came up with a way to explain away replacing a protocol that didn't really exist - a backstory, if you will. Sure, there was NCP, it was mostly a kludge of heterogeneous management and communications programs that varied from system to system, site to site, with several commonalities and inconsistencies that were hobbled together with bailing twine, coat hangers, and duct tape (for lack of a better metaphor).

So we really, really, needed something as uniform and ubiquitous as the promise that Internet Protocol would deliver. Because Bill Joy and others had done so much work at UC Berkeley, we actually had 4.1BSD (4.1a) to work with on our DEC machinery. As a junior member of my division, in both age and experience, I was given the task of, let's say throwing the switch on some of our machines, so to speak, when we cut over from the NCP spaghetti and henceforth embraced TCP/IP no matter what, on Flag Day - 01 January 1983.

So you see,the adoption of Internet Protocol was not a de facto occurrence - it was de jure, a government mandate to occur at a specific time on a specific day.

It literally had nothing to do with popularity or some kind of organic adoption, the erroneously described, so-called demise of the OSI model, or any physical network topology.

DARPA said 01 January 1983 and that's it, and that was it - Flag Day.

Sure, it took a few days for several facilities to come up (anyone not running IP was summarily and unceremoniously cut off from the ARPANET).

And one also needs to consider that it wasn't every machine - we only had some machines that were Internet hosts. We still had a lot of mainframes and mini computers, etc., that were interconnected within our facilities in a hodgepodge or some other fashion. Nowadays we have a tendency to be somewhat incredulous if every device doesn't directly connect over IP to the Internet in some way. That wasn't the case back then - you passed traffic internally, sometimes by unmounting tapes from one machine and mounting them on another.

There was a lot of hand wringing, stress, boatloads of frustration, and concern by people over keeping their jobs all over the world. But that's why and when it happened. Six months later in the UNIX portions of networks we had much greater stability with the release of 4.2BSD, but it wouldn't really be until a few years later Net2 was released that things settled down with the virtually flawless networking stability that we enjoy today.

Enjoy!

.

beardedtechguy,
@beardedtechguy@allthingstech.social avatar

Good morning #Fediverse friends.

Let’s kick off our #KoffeeWithKyle chat and see what we all have planned for our Saturday.

My daughter had quite a few fraudulent changes on her bank card yesterday so we have to track those down and take actions to see if her identity wasn’t stolen. Then I’m not sure what else is planned.

#GoodMorning #HappySaturday #INeedCoffee

Mood Golf GIF by Yevbel

cliffwade,
@cliffwade@allthingstech.social avatar

@beardedtechguy Morning good sir!

Damn! Sucks to hear about the fraud charges. Hope you get it taken care of quickly. It's one of the worst things that can happen to us in my opinion. Then having to change your credit card everywhere after you get a new one and all that is such a pain.

davemark,
@davemark@mastodon.social avatar

Popped up on my Apple Watch:

"1 fediverse user liked your post"

First time I've seen this. Looks like the "fediverse seeing Threads posts" setting actually works.

Cool beans. 😎

martind,
@martind@mastodon.online avatar

@davemark so if
I like this now, does it pop?

davemark,
@davemark@mastodon.social avatar

@martind hmmm. Not yet.

ben,
@ben@mastodon.bentasker.co.uk avatar

New : Adding a Fediverse Comments Box to a Site

This documentation details adding mastodon-post (by @DavidDarnes) into a static site generated by the Nikola in order to link back to discussion in the

https://www.bentasker.co.uk/posts/documentation/general/embedding-a-mastodon-comments-box-in-a-nikola-site-template.html

DavidDarnes,
@DavidDarnes@mastodon.design avatar

@ben thanks for using and sharing my web component! You’re right about XSS, it’s a risk that you’ve just got to use your judgment on

cliffwade,
@cliffwade@allthingstech.social avatar

Good morning and happy Saturday to all of you!

What do we all have planned for the day today and the rest of the weekend?

For me, there are no plans today. Just going to enjoy the day, enjoy the weekend and just rest and relax as much as possible.

I'll certainly play some video games, as I'm doing currently and not much else.

jnv,
@jnv@fosstodon.org avatar

@cliffwade Good morning. I should do house tasks outside but I have no energy. I did take out the garbage! 😂

I should at least start doing taxes too 😩

cliffwade,
@cliffwade@allthingstech.social avatar

@jnv Morning! I need to mow the lawns, but it's just too damn windy here again today.

I did taxes yesterday. What a shitty day of the year. LOL

twicsydakopigfolgere, Vietnamese
twicsydakopigfolgere avatar
laaspher, German
@laaspher@nrw.social avatar

… und auch bei dieser Grafik wäre es schön gewesen, wenn @BMWK diese hier im veröffentlicht hätte!

box464,
@box464@mastodon.social avatar

I love seeing these smaller activitypub creations popping up in various programming languages. Makes me think documentation on the basics is getting better, and with Evan's ActivityPub book coming out soon, even more so. Exciting, y'all!

https://github.com/purifetchi/Toki?tab=readme-ov-file

qkslvrwolf,
@qkslvrwolf@mastodon.social avatar
eb,
@eb@social.coop avatar

Has the replaced tech twitter? Instead of listening to Elon Musk, let's check Hacker News.

Our first statistic is the number of posts. As you can see, twitter lost some activity post-musk, and the fediverse took it. Big disparity, though.

But wait. The drop in quality on twitter is much more drastic. Despite similar volumes, it's upvoted less.

Our final chart shows that posts on the fediverse are, on average, regarded slightly higher than twitter ever was.

image/png
image/png

ricmac,
@ricmac@mastodon.social avatar

Post from @rabble on why he's chosen to use and not and the . He makes some compelling points. Personally I am not too worried about the server admin parts of his argument (I have enough control, even if I don't control the server), but I agree that this isn't ideal:

"You can’t use a single fediverse identity with your profile and followers in Peertube, Mobilizon, WriteFreely, and Pixelfed. You need a totally separate account in each one."
https://njump.me/nevent1qqsfqlx6wpl5267tmnmmjk7v9tzunjvhzav9unc2tjn6k0w82vghprsppamhxue69uhkummnw3ezumt0d5qjxamnwvaz7tmswfhhs7fdv4u8qetjd9kk2mn59ehkuun9dejx2u3wvdhk6qg5waehxw309aex2mrp0yhxgctdw4eju6t0qy2hwumn8ghj7un9d3shjtnddaehgu3wwp6kyqgkwaehxw309aex2mrp0yhxummnw3ezucnpdejqzxrhwden5te0wfjkccte9ehx7umhdpjhyefwvdhk6q3qwmr34t36fy03m8hvgl96zl3znndyzyaqhwmwdtshwmtkg03fetaqxczx4f

renwillis,
@renwillis@mstdn.social avatar

@Gargron @ricmac @rabble They raised up a decent point or 2, albeit not fully correct. There is migration, but it’s not user friendly. queer.af did go down, but leaning on country-owned domains isn’t smart. Lot of bad info in the post too.

But goodness, what is all this stuff about keys? Isn’t Nostr, like, a crypto-bro “Jack” thing, which is chock full o’ its own problematic issues?

Yeah… I’m good here.

image/png

renwillis,
@renwillis@mstdn.social avatar

@Gargron @ricmac @rabble I will say this though, Nostr does seem like a nazi & hate-monger’s fevered dream! No censorship. No moderation. https://www.freethink.com/internet/nostr

mike,
@mike@flipboard.social avatar

Today was a huge milestone in our quest to federate #Flipboard and tear down the walls around our own walled garden.

First, we launched a new version of Flipboard for iOS and Android which brings the promise of two way federation to life. Now when a federated Flipboard user curates, people in the fediverse can reply, favorite, boost or follow those Flipboard users who will in turn see that activity in their usual notifications tab. Even better, Flipboard users can directly reply to people in the fediverse -- and very soon they will also be able to follow each other.

Second, we federated some of our best curators today who are actively curating more than 10,000 magazines about everything from climate change to kale smoothie recipes. I'm grateful to our many curators and the service they provide to so many others who want to find the best content about a shared interest. I know our curators are excited to have millions more people who could potentially benefit from their curation. I also know that people in the fediverse will give a warm welcome to these curators. Especially now that everyone can hear and talk to each other over what was once two totally separate networks but now increasingly are in one and the same #fediverse.

zdl,
@zdl@mastodon.online avatar

@mike Before too many in the Fediverse jump onto the bandwagon you might want to take a look at the summary of their terms of service: https://tosdr.org/en/service/3534

Chief problems for me are the fact they gather and store data of non-users, they gather location data, they sell that to third-parties for reasons not related to their service, they buy data about you from third-parties, they force binding arbitration, they limit liability to ludicrous levels.

Your mileage may vary, of course.

mike,
@mike@flipboard.social avatar

@dansup Thanks Dan! Next up is finishing our integration such that all Flipboard users can follow anyone on Pixelfed. I can't wait to feature your best users to ours.

hankg,

The diversity of network and UX types across the fediverse/social web that my little Friendica server sees is astounding. This is just Diaspora and ActivityPub federated content since Bluesky is integrated through a client API not AT.

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